EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
52,725,316
Abstracts:
28,411,598
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Differences in the metabolism and disposition of inhaled tritiated benzene by f344 n rats and b6c3f 1 mice


Toxicology & Applied Pharmacology 94(1): 128-140
Differences in the metabolism and disposition of inhaled tritiated benzene by f344 n rats and b6c3f 1 mice
Benzene is a potent hematotoxin and has been shown to cause leukemia in man. Chronic toxicity studies that B6C3F1 mice are more susceptible than F334/N rats to benzene toxicity. The purpose of the studies presented in this paper was to determine if there were metabolic differences between F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice which might be responsible for this increased susceptibility. Metabolites of benzene in blood, liver, lung, and bone marrow were measured during and following a 6-hr 50 ppm exposure to benzene vapor. Hydroquinone glucuronide, hydroquinone, and muconic acid, which reflect pathways leading to potential toxic metabolites of benzene, were present in much greater concentrations in the mouse than in rat tissues. Phenylsulfate, a detoxified metabolite, and an unknown water-soluble metabolite were present in approximately equal concentrations in these two species. These results indicate that the proportion of benzene metabolized via pathways leading to the formation of potentially toxic metabolites as opposed to detoxification pathways was much higher in B6C3F1 mice than in F344 rats, which may explain the higher susceptibility of mice to benzene-induced hematotoxicity and carcinogenicity.


Accession: 005151395



Related references

Differences in the metabolism and disposition of inhaled [3H]benzene by F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice. Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology 94(1): 128-140, 1988

Toxicity of inhaled chloroprene (2-chloro-1,3-butadiene) in F344 rats and B6C3F-1 mice. Toxicology 108(1-2): 79-91, 1996

Toxicity of inhaled chloroprene (2-chloro-1,3-butadiene) in F344 rats and B6C3F(1) mice. Toxicology 108(1-2): 79-91, 1996

Disposition and metabolism of cumene in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice. Drug Metabolism and Disposition: the Biological Fate of Chemicals 39(3): 498-509, 2011

Thyrotoxic response of f344 rats and b6c3f 1 mice to salicylazosulfapyridine. FASEB Journal 2(4): ABSTRACT 1406, 1988

Effects of D and C yellow no. 11 ingestion on F344/N rats and B6C3F, mice. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health 48(2): 197-213, 1996

Toxicity and carcinogenicity of hydroquinone in F344/N rats and B6C3F-1 mice. Food & Chemical Toxicology 30(9): 737-747, 1992

Expression of myc, fos, and Ha-ras in the livers of furan-treated F344 rats and B6C3F-1 mice. Molecular Carcinogenesis. 9(1): 24-32, 1994

Toxicity and carcinogenicity of 2,3-dibromo-1-propanol in F344/N rats and B6C3F-1 mice. Fundamental & Applied Toxicology 26(1): 41-50, 1995

Inhalation toxicity of 1,6-hexanediamine dihydrochloride in F344/N rats and B6C3F-1 mice. Fundamental & Applied Toxicology. 20(3): 348-359, 1993