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Different baseline sister chromatid exchange levels in density fractionated human lymphocytes


Human Genetics 73(2): 114-118
Different baseline sister chromatid exchange levels in density fractionated human lymphocytes
Different activation states of B and T lymphocytes, as manifested by differences in cell density, were obtained by Percoll density centrifugation of unstimulated human lymphocytes. Four different density fractions were defined: B cells with low (1.043 g/ml) and high (1.056) density, and T cells with low (1.067) and high (1.077) density, respectively. Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) conditions and proliferation rates were determined. Total B cells, stimulated by the bacterial mitogen Branhamella, had 4.6 SCE per cell, the lowest mean baseline SCE level recorded among lymphocytes. The growth rate was intermediate between that of low and high density T cells. The two T cell fractions stimulated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) had different baseline SCE frequencies and different growth characteristics: the low density cells had 5.7 SCEs per cell and a short cell cycle, whereas high density cells had 12.5 SCEs per cell and a longer cell cycle. The differences in baseline SCE frequency and growth characteristics between the two T cell fractions seem to be correlated with the differences in the activation state as reflected by the cell density. Both high and low density T cells are G0 populations which supposedly differ with respect to previous history in vivo such as age and contact with antigens. The reason why these cells react differently to bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) is unknown, but differences in intracellular DNA precursor pools and enzyme activities might play a role.

Accession: 005151899

PMID: 3721498

DOI: 10.1007/bf00291598

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