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Different biochemical composition of connective tissue in continent and stress incontinent women


, : Different biochemical composition of connective tissue in continent and stress incontinent women. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 66(5): 455-457

The collagen content in biopsies from skin and ligamentum rotundum of 7 women with a long history of stress incontinence was compared with that of continent controls. The collagen was extracted with 0.5 M acetic acid, followed by digestion with pepsin and quantitated as hydroxyproline. The skin of stress incontinent women contained 40% less collagen than that of continent women. The findings for ligamentum rotundum were similar. These results suggest a deteriorated connective tissue in stress-incontinent women and cast new light on the etiology of the disease.

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Accession: 005151938

PMID: 3425248

DOI: 10.3109/00016348709022054

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