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Different Characteristics of the Two Glutamate Synthases in the Green Leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum


Plant Physiology 85(4): 1036-1039
Different Characteristics of the Two Glutamate Synthases in the Green Leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum
The two glutamate synthases, NAD(P)H- and ferredoxin-dependent, from the green leaves of tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum L. cv Hellfrucht frühstamm) differed in their chemical properties and catalytic behavior. Gel filtration of NAD(P)H enzyme gave an apparent molecular size of 158 kilodalton, whereas the ferredoxin enzyme molecular size was 141 kilodalton. Arrhenius plots of the activities of the two enzymes showed that the NAD(P)H enzyme had two activation energies; 109.6 and 70.5 kilojoule per mole; the transition temperature was 22 degrees C. The ferredoxin enzyme however, had only one activation energy; 56.1 kilojoule per mole. The respective catalytic activity pH optima for the NAD(P)H- dependent and the ferredoxin dependent enzymes were around 7.3 and 7.8. In experiments to evaluate the effects of modulators aspartate enhanced the NAD(P)H-linked activity, with a K(a) value of 0.25 millimolar, but strongly inhibited that of the ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase with a K(i) of 0.1 millimolar. 3-Phosphoserine was another inhibitor of the ferredoxin dependent enzyme with a K(i) value of 4.9 millimolar. 3-Phosphoglyceric acid was a potent inhibitor of the ferredoxin-dependent form, but hardly affected the NAD(P)H-dependent enzyme. The results are discussed and interpreted to propose different specific functions that these activities may have within the leaf tissue cell.

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Accession: 005151982

PMID: 16665799

DOI: 10.1104/pp.85.4.1036



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