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Digestibility and related nutritional data for 7 northern deer browse species



Digestibility and related nutritional data for 7 northern deer browse species



Journal of Wildlife Management 40(4): 630-638



Energy use and related data are presented for 7 northern winter foods of white-tailed deer (Odocileus virginianus). Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), balsam fir (Abies balsamea), red maple (Acer rubrum), striped maple (A. pensylvanicum), mountain maple (A. spicatum), hobblebush (Viburnum alnifolium) and hazelnut (Corylus cornuta) were fed in mixed rations to captive deer. Species tested had gross energy digestibilities ranging from 30 (red maple) to 54% (hobblebush). The amount of digestible, metabolizable and net energy in each of the 3 maple species evaluated was very similar. Metabolizable energy ranged from 24% (1.2 kcal/g) for striped maple to 46% (2.2 kacl/g) for hobblebush. The lowest net energy was observed for striped maple (5% or 0.2 kcal/g), the highest for hobblebush (37% or 1.8 kcal/g). Crude protein was digested poorly in hemlock, balsam and red maple (-5, 11 and 1% digestible, respectively) as compared with an average value of 47% for the remaining 4 spp. The digestibilities of fat, fiber and N free extract of the 7 plant species are presented and discussed. An example of the calculation of browse requirement during a northern winter period, based on these and related data, is presented.

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Accession: 005161298

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