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Digestion of milk protein and methanol grown bacterial protein in the pre ruminant calf 2. amino acid composition of ileal digesta and feces and blood levels of free amino acids






Reproduction Nutrition Developpement 20(3 PART A): 615-630

Digestion of milk protein and methanol grown bacterial protein in the pre ruminant calf 2. amino acid composition of ileal digesta and feces and blood levels of free amino acids

The balance of amino acid digestion of milk and of methanol-grown bacterial protein in the terminal small intestine and the hindgut of the preruminant calf was studied. Two diets (control and bacteria) were used. The protein of the control diet was furnished exclusively by skim-milk powder; 50% protein of the bacterial diet, supplied by methanol-grown bacteria and the rest by skim-milk powder and synthetic amino acids. Except for methionine, the apparent digestibility of all the amino acids assayed was lower in the terminal small intestine than in the whole digestive tract. The differences were usually less than for total nitrogen. The largest difference concerned cystine, whose apparent digestibility increased from 76% in the terminal ileum to 87% in the feces for the control diet. The corresponding values for the bacterial diet were 64 and 79%. Diaminopimelic acid of dietary bacteria did not seem to be absorbed in the small intestine but large quantities disappeared in the large intstine. Amino acid digestibility was higher for the milk than for the dietary bacteria, except for threonine and glycine in the terminal ileum and glycine and alanine in feces. The ileal digesta were richer than the feces in threonine, serine, proline and cystine and were poorer in methionine, isoleucine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, lysine and arginine. These differences might result from a larger proportion of endogenous protein and a lower amount of gut bacterial protein in the digesta, which also contained more dietary protein than the feces, at least with the bacterial diet, as shown by the quantities of diaminopimelic acid found with that diet. The respective proportions of dietary, endogenous and gut microbial proteins estimated in the terminal ileum were 16, 71 and 13%, respectively, with the control diet. The lower digestibility of nitrogen from methanol-grown bacteria seemed due mostly to bacterial wall protein (especially peptidoglycan) resistance to digestion in the small intestine. The differences as compared to milk protein were small; they did not permit the showing of unavailability of any particular amino acid (except for diaminopimelic acid) at the digestive or the metabolic level.

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Accession: 005161580



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