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Electrophoretic study of cutthroat trout salmo clarki populations in utah usa


, : Electrophoretic study of cutthroat trout salmo clarki populations in utah usa. Great Basin Naturalist 45(4): 677-687

Thirty-nine Utah streams were sampled for cutthroat trout. Of these, 31 contain cutthroat or cutthroat/rainbow hybrid populations. By using starch gel electrophoresis, these populations were segregated into three groups. One group consisted predominately of fish from the Sevier River (of the Bonneville Basin) and Colorado drainages. A second was primarily populations from the Bear River Drainage (Bonneville Basin) as well as some scattered population along the Wasatch Front (Bonneville Basin). The third consisted of Wasatch Front populations and populations that have hybridized with rainbow trout. Since different subspecies of cutthroat trout are native to the Colorado and Bonneville drainages, one would expect the populations from within the Bonneville Basin to be more similar to one another and less similar to the Colorado River populations. That this did not occur raises questions concerning the evolutionary relationships of the subspecies and the populations. It is clear that at least a northern (Bear River) and southern (Sevier River) form of the Bonneville cutthroat exists. The Wasatch Front may represent an intermediate zone where these two forms intergrade.

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