EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
52,725,316
Abstracts:
28,411,598
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Epidemiological study of the survival time of persons killed in road traffic accidents


Nihon University Journal of Medicine 25(2): 85-104
Epidemiological study of the survival time of persons killed in road traffic accidents
In 2623 persons killed in road traffic accidents, the survival time, or the time lapse between the affliction of injuries from the accident and resultant death, was obtained. The survival ratio and cumulative mortality ratio were calculated for each survival time group. These data were analyzed according to the victims' ages, types of accidents, body regions of the main injuries, and the time of accident occurrence. The mortality ratio was 33.9% for the first 30 min, 41.3% for 1 h, 70.0% for 24 h, and 93.6% for 30 days after the accident. Those who survived for 1 yr or more comprised 0.6% of the total deaths. The survival time was short in the groups of young people, automobile drivers and passengers, people with neck injuries and victims of nighttime accidents. In the case of old people, pedal cyclists, pedestrians, people with extremity injuries and victims of daytime accidents, a larger proportion of the victims died after a long survival time. The survival time thus differed according to various factors. With the cumulative mortality ratio as the dependent variable (y1, y2, y3) and the logarithmically transformed survival time as the independent variable (t1, t2, t3), linear regression models were formulated such as: y1 = 0.4169 + 0.2080 log t1 (0.5 .ltoreq. t1 .ltoreq. 24 h), y2 = 0.7005 + 0.1652 log t2 (1 < t2 .ltoreq. 30 days) and y3 = 0.9363 + 0.0577 log t3 (1 < t3 .ltoreq. 12 mo.). The residuals of the actual values with respect to those calculated from these models were quite small.


Accession: 005375619



Related references

Clinical study of cats injured and killed in road traffic accidents in Cambridgeshire. Journal of Small Animal Practice 45(8): 390-394, 2004

Clinical study of cats injured and killed in road traffic accidents in Cambridgeshire. Journal of Small Animal Practice 45(8): 390-394, 2004

An epidemiological study on road traffic accidents in the northeast thames health region england uk. Journal of Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine 94(10): 981-998, 1985

An Epidemiological Study of Road Traffic Accidents in Guilan Province, Northern Iran in 2012. Bulletin of Emergency and Trauma 4(4): 230-235, 2016

An epidemiological study on pattern of thoraco-abdominal injuries sustained in fatal road traffic accidents of Bangalore: Autopsy-based study. Journal of Emergencies, Trauma, and Shock 7(2): 116-120, 2014

Toxicological investigations of drivers killed in road traffic accidents in Norway during 2006-2008. Forensic Science International 212(1-3): 102-109, 2012

Road traffic accidents in Kenya: an epidemiological appraisal. East African Medical Journal 72(5): 299-305, 1995

Epidemiological features of the injured in road traffic accidents in Shanghai. Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi 24(5): 344-348, 2008

Epidemiological profile of road traffic accidents in Peru, 2005-2009. Revista Peruana de Medicina Experimental Y Salud Publica 27(2): 162-169, 2011

Pattern of Injuries due to Fatal Road Traffic Accidents in Rural Haryana An Epidemiological Survey. 2012