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Epidemiology of cervical cancer by cell type


Cancer Research 47(6): 1706-1711
Epidemiology of cervical cancer by cell type
A multicenter case-control study of 481 invasive cervical cancer patients and 801 population controls enabled comparison of risk factors for squamous cell tumors (n = 418), adenosquamous cancers (n = 23), and adenocarcinomas (n = 40). The epidemiology of the squamous cell tumors resembled that found in other studies, with the major risk factors being absence of Pap smear screening (relative risk = 3.6 to 4.8 for those not screened within 5 yr), multiple sexual partners (relative risk = 2.9 for over ten partners), and history of genital infections or sores (relative risk = 2.3). Although based on small numbers, adenosquamous tumors appeared to share some of these risk factors, notably number of sexual partners, years since last Pap smear, and level of education. Adenocarcinomas were not similarly affected, although sexual practices were marginally predictive. Obesity increased the risk of adenocarcinoma, but no other similarities to endometrial adenocarcinoma were obtained. Smoking was a significant predictor of squamous cell tumors but did not affect adenocarcinomas. Extended use of oral contraceptives was a risk factor for all tumor types, especially adenocarcinoma, and a familial tendency to cervical cancer was also observed for all cell types.


Accession: 005375986

PMID: 3815368



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