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Evaluation of a maximal predictive cycle ergometer test of aerobic power






European Journal of Applied Physiology & Occupational Physiology 49(1): 131-140

Evaluation of a maximal predictive cycle ergometer test of aerobic power

A maximal predictive cycle ergometer (CE) test for estimating maximal O2 uptake (.ovrhdot.VO2 max) was evaluated in 15 male and 12 female [human] subjects. The test consisted of pedaling a cycle ergometer (Monark) at 75 rpm, beginning at an intensity of 37.5 W and increasing by this amount each minute until the subject could no longer maintain pedal rate. The highest work rate achieved was recorded as the endpoint of the test and used to construct regression equations to predict .ovrhdot.VO2 max. This was compared with 2 direct measures of .ovrhdot.VO2 max [an interrupted treadmill (TM) run and an interrupted CE procedure at 60 rpm] and with the submaximal predictive test of Astrand-Rhyming. When compared to TM .ovrhdot.VO2 max, .ovrhdot.VO2 measured during the final 30 s of the maximal predictive CE test was 16.0% and 16.2% lower for males and females, respectively; compared to .ovrhdot.VO2 max determined by the direct CE test, it was lower by 2.9% for males and 5.2% for females. Correlation coefficients for .ovrhdot.VO2 max predicted from the maximal predictive CE test and .ovrhdot.VO2 max measured directly by CE and TM were 0.89 and 0.87 for males and 0.88 and 0.83 for females (P < 0.01), respectively. The .ovrhdot.VO2 max predicted from the Astrand-Rhyming test correlated significantly with .ovrhdot.VO2 max measured by CE and TM only in the male group. Test-retest reliability coefficients for intensity (W) on the maximal predictive CE test were 0.95 and 0.81 for males and females, respectively (P < 0.01). This CE test gives a reliable and valid estimate of .ovrhdot.VO2 max.

Accession: 005395207

PMID: 7201925

DOI: 10.1007/bf00428971

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