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Evidence of transcription from the late region of the integrated sv 40 genome in transformed cells location of the 5' ends of late transcripts in cells abortively infected and in cells transformed by sv 40


Journal of Virology 46(3): 756-767
Evidence of transcription from the late region of the integrated sv 40 genome in transformed cells location of the 5' ends of late transcripts in cells abortively infected and in cells transformed by sv 40
By means of S1 mapping, spliced 16S and 19S viral late mRNA, in addition to early mRNA were observed to be present in cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNA preparations from SV 40-transformed cell lines of rat or mouse origin containing no detectable amount of free viral DNA. The amounts of early and late virus-specific mRNA in these lines were quantified by hybridization of radioactive cytoplasmic polyadenylated RNA with cloned region-specific restriction fragments. The relative amount of late viral mRNA produced in these transformed cells was found to be of the same order as that produced in SV40 infected, nonpermissive baby mouse kidney cells. By using the S1 nuclease protection method, the 5' ends of late mRNA produced in transformed cells, in abortively infected mouse cells and in the late phase of the lytic cycle, were compared. The 5' ends of late mRNA both in abortively infected and in transformed cells were less heterogeneous than the 5' ends of late mRNA both in abortively infected and in transformed cells were less heterogeneous than the 5' ends of late mRNA produced during the lytic cycle; they were a subset of the 5' ends of late transcripts produced in the lytic cycle.


Accession: 005411816



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