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Exogenous gibberellin as responsible for the seedless berry development of grapes 7. change in the activity of gibberellic acid applied to the inflorescence


Tohoku Journal of Agricultural Research 32(2): 87-99
Exogenous gibberellin as responsible for the seedless berry development of grapes 7. change in the activity of gibberellic acid applied to the inflorescence
Tritium activity applied as [3H(U)]GA3 to the inflorescence decreased rapidly with time after application, almost in parallel with the biological GA activity, and reached .apprx. 20% of the activity found immediately after application on the 8th day. This was also true for the 14C activity applied as [1, 7, 12, 18-14C]GA3. 3H activity was lost from the inflorescence by volatilization and the loss reached .apprx. 23% on the 13th day after application. The disappearance of GA activity in the inflorescence was probably partly due to the separation of hydrogens or side chains from the gibbane skeleton and further decomposition of the gibbane skeleton per se. Biological GA activity and 3H activity retained in the inflorescence were detected mainly in the acidic ethyl acetate fraction within 8 days after application. When TLC was carried out on that fraction, biological GA activity was found at Rf 0.2-0.5, which corresponded to the Rf of GA3. Thus, the active substance retained in the inflorescence apparently remained as GA3 per se. After 8 days, however, the activity decreased in the acidic ethyl acetate fraction while it increased in the ether fraction. Tritium activity was found also in the shoot sustaining the GA-treated inflorescence, reaching the maximum of 5.8% of the activity initially found in the inflorescence on the 7th day. The activity was distributed mostly to the leaves just below and above the inflorescence but a little to the leaf opposite to the inflorescence. Thus, the disappearance of GA activity in the inflorescence seemed due to the transformation of GA in the inflorescence per se, the translocation of GA to the shoot and the subsequent transformation of translocated GA in the shoot. On the 13th day after GA application, however, only 50% of the activity initially found in the inflorescence could be recovered, when GA activity lost by these processes was added to the activity retained in the inflorescence.

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Accession: 005419046



Related references

Exogenous gibberellin as responsible for the seedless berry development of grapes. VII. Change in the activity of GA applied to the inflorescence. Tohoku Journal of Agricultural Research 32(2): 87-99, 1981

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