EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
47,893,527
Abstracts:
28,296,643
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Fungal development and plant response in detached onion allium cepa onion bulb scales and leaves inoculated with botrytis allii botrytis cinerea botrytis fabae and botrytis squamosa


, : Fungal development and plant response in detached onion allium cepa onion bulb scales and leaves inoculated with botrytis allii botrytis cinerea botrytis fabae and botrytis squamosa. Plant Pathology (Oxford) 33(3): 401-410

Fungal development and plant responses were examined in detached leaves and mid-bulb scales of A. cepa. Following inoculation with suspensions of 105 conidia/ml distilled water B. squamosa consistently produced spreading lesions in leaves and bulb scales. B. allii produced spreading lesions at most sites in bulbs but was very inconsistent in its infection of leaves; lesions were often confined to inoculation sites. Limited lesions were usually produced by B. cinerea but B. fabae failed to produce symptoms at most sites. Extensive colonization by B. allii and B. squamosa required rapid penetration and totally necrotrophic fungal growth. During development of a spreading lesion, plant cell walls became very swollen around intramural hyphae and wall swelling appeared to precede epidermal cell death. Resistance to colonization was due to poor germination, failure to produce distinct infection hyphae (associated with accumulation of deposits of granular reaction material [RM] in underlying live cells) or restriction of infection hyphae among small groups of dead cells (limited lesion formation). Only B. fabae germinated poorly, and germ-tubes produced often failed to attempt penetration but grew over the leaf or bulb scale surface. Reducing numbers of conidia increased the frequency of sites associated with RM accumulation; granular deposits being particularly common at sites inoculated with low numbers of B. allii conidia. EM reveled that RM granules were osmiophilic aggregates formed between the plasma membrane and epidermal cell wall. In the absence of RM, growth of avirulent species was restricted with the swollen walls of dead epidermal cells. Results are compared with those from studies on tulip and broad bean leaves.


Accession: 005494798

Submit PDF Full Text: Here


Submit PDF Full Text

No spam - Every submission is manually reviewed

Due to poor quality, we do not accept files from Researchgate

Submitted PDF Full Texts will always be free for everyone
(We only charge for PDFs that we need to acquire)

Select a PDF file:
Close
Close

Related references

Stewart, A.M.nsfield, J., 1984: Fungal development and plant response in detached onion, onion bulb scales and leaves inoculated with Botrytis allii, Botrytis cinerea, Botrytis fabae and Botrytis squamosa. Plant pathology 33(3): 401-409

Stewart, A.; Mansfield, J.W., 1984: Fungal development and plant response in detached onion, onion bulb scales and leaves inoculated with Botrytis allii, B. cinerea, B. fabae and B. squamosa. Following inoculation with suspensions of 105 conidia/ml distilled water B. [Sclerotinia] squamosa consistently produced spreading lesions in leaves and bulb scales. B. allii produced spreading lesions at most sites in bulbs but was very inconsist...

Rist D.L.; Lorbeer J.W., 1984: Moderate dosages of ozone enhance infection of onion allium cepa leaves by botrytis cinerea but not by botrytis squamosa. Exposure of onion plants to moderate chronic dosages of ozone under controlled conditions resulted in predisposition of the older leaves to enhanced infection by B. cinerea. More lesions/cm2 of leaf surface were induced by B. cinerea on the 2 olde...

Clark, C.A.; Lorbeer, J.W., 1976: Comparative histo pathology of botrytis squamosa and botrytis cinerea on onion leaves. B. squamosa and B. cinerea had different prepenetration activities on onion [Allium cepa] leaves with and without exogenous nutrients. In water B. squamosa conidia germinated on the side closest to the nearest anticlinal wall juncture or stomate a...

Clark C.A.; Lorbeer J.W., 1975: Histo pathology of botrytis squamosa and botrytis cinerea on onion leaves. Proceedings of the American Phytopathological Society 2: 66

Clark C.A.; Lorbeer J.W., 1976: Nutrient relations of botrytis squamosa and botrytis cinerea on onion leaves. Proceedings of the American Phytopathological Society 3: (1977)

Clark, C.A.; Lorbeer, J.W., 1977: The role of phyllosphere bacteria in pathogenesis by botrytis squamosa and botrytis cinerea on onion leaves. Numbers of lesions formed by B. squamosa on onion [Allium cepa] leaves were reduced only slightly by 2 of 13 onion leaf surface bacteria. Ten of the isolates stimulated greater frequency of lesion formation. Conidial germination of B. squamosa and...

Rist, D.; Lorbeer, J., 1984: Moderate dosages of ozone enhance infection of onion leaves by Botrytis cinerea but not by Botrytis squamosa. Phytopathology 74(7): 761-767

Clark, C.A.; Lorbeer, J.W., 1977: Comparative nutrient dependency of botrytis squamosa and botrytis cinerea for germination of conidia and pathogenicity on onion leaves. Germination of conidia and germ tube length of isolates of B. squamosa were similar in water and nutrient solution. Spraying conidia in water onto [onion, Allium cepa] leaves resulted in production of expanding lesions. The frequency of lesions wa...

Hancock, J.G.; Lorbeer, J.W., 1963: Pathogenesis of Botrytis cinerea, B. squamosa, and B. allii on Onion leaves. Field collections in N.Y. in 1961 showed that B. cinerea conidia may occur frequently on necrotic onion leaves in light or heavy blight infestations, while B. squamosa occurs only in fields with severe blight, and B. allii is encountered infrequen...