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Histological physiological and genetical studies of the responses of leaves and pods of phaseolus vulgaris to three races of pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola and to pseudomonas syringae pathovar coronafaciens



Histological physiological and genetical studies of the responses of leaves and pods of phaseolus vulgaris to three races of pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola and to pseudomonas syringae pathovar coronafaciens



Physiological & Molecular Plant Pathology 31(2): 153-172



The responses of bean leaves and pods to races 1, 2 and 3 of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola and to P. s. pv. coronafaciens were compared. Compatible and incompatible reactions were more clearly distinguished in pods than in leaves. Ultrastructural studies showed that a prolonged biotrophic phase of infection occurred in susceptible pods. Colonies of avirulent and virulent bacteria were surrounded by acidic polysaccharides in the intercellular spaces. A rapid hypersensitive reaction (HR) occurred in tissues of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Tendergreen inoculated with race 3 or P. s. pv. coronafaciens. The intensity of the reaction was indicated by the low numbers of bacteria required for symptom development, shorter induction times than for race 1 in P. vulgaris cv. Red Mexican and higher concentrations of phaseollin recovered from cv. Tendergreen than other cultivars. Experiments with mixed inocula suggested that production of elicitors of the HR rather than suppression of the resistant reaction by virulent isolates occurred. No evidence was obtained for the release of diffusible elicitors of the HR from avirulent bacteria or from responding tissue. Mutants of race 3 with altered virulence were recovered following treatment with nitrosoguanidine causing c. 7% of survivors to be auxotrophs. Three categories of mutants were recovered after screening on pods of cultivars Canadian Wonder, Red Mexican and Tendergreen (1) mutants with altered varietal specificity, they had lost the ability to cause the HR in cv. Tendergreen but caused large watersoaked lesions in all cultivars tested, (2) forms which caused small watersoaked lesions in the susceptible cultivars, Canadian Wonder and Red Mexican, but caused the HR in cv. Tendergreen, and (3) non-pathogenic forms failing to cause symptoms in any cultivar.

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