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Introgression between the cultivated hexa ploid oat avena sativa and the tetra ploid wild avena magna and avena murphyi



Introgression between the cultivated hexa ploid oat avena sativa and the tetra ploid wild avena magna and avena murphyi



Canadian Journal of Genetics and Cytology 19(1): 59-66



Introgression between the hexaploid (2n = 42) oat A. sativa and the newly discovered tetraploid (2n = 28) species A. magna and A. murphyi was studied by the rate of stabilization of chromosome number, restoration of fertility of pentaploid hybrid derivatives and the ultimate gene transfer between the tetraploid and the hexaploid levels. The complete self-sterility of the pentaploid F1 hybrids was overcome by massive back-pollination to the parental species. Great variation in chromosome number (12-48) was found among the viable F1 female gametes. Meiotically stable and reasonably fertile derivatives were selected only at the F2 of the BC [backcross] and in a relatively small proportion. Gene transfer between the tetraploid and the hexaploid species was demonstrated by introducing the allele for nonshattering seed from the cultivated oat A. sativa to both A. magna and A. murphyi, and lemma hairiness from the tetraploids to the hexaploid level. The possible exploitation of introgression between the polyploid oats for breeding purposes was pointed out and the potential of A. magna and A. murphyi as cultived oats was briefly discussed.

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Accession: 005745599

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