EurekaMag.com logo
+ Translate

Parental investment a prospective analysis


, : Parental investment a prospective analysis. Animal Behaviour 25(1): 1-9

It is a feature of the 3 described models that 2 alternative strategies are often possible; the duck strategy in which the male deserts and only the female cares for the young, and the stickleback strategy in which only the male cares for the young. These 2 possibilities are likely if one parent is almost as effective as 2 in caring for the young, and if the prospects of a deserting parent mating again are good. In those species in which the strategy is for 1 parent to desert, it well tend to be the male which cares for the young if the female has invested so much in eggs that she cannot effectively do so, or if there is an excess of males; it will tend to be the female which cares for the young if the timing of mating is such that a deserting male has a better chance of re-mating than a deserting female, or if there is an excess of females. In contrast, if 2 parents can raise twice as many offspring as 1, or if the chance that a deserting parent will remate is small, then monogamy with both parents caring for the young is the likely strategy. The strategies observed in different vertebrate groups are reviewed. Some features which are comprehensible in terms of the analysis and some which are unexplained are indicated. In many groups of vertebrates uniparental care of the young is found in species in which the parent guards but does not feed the young. This is as expected, and a plausible explanation can be offered for some of the exceptions (e.g., geese). It is by no means so clear what determines which sex shall care for the young. In a sense, this is also expected, since theory predicts that in many cases either the duck or the stickleback strategy could be stable, so that the actual state of affairs now depends on the initial conditions in an ancestral species.

Accession: 006063812

DOI: 10.1016/0003-3472(77)90062-8

Download PDF Full Text: Parental investment a prospective analysis


Submit PDF Full Text

No spam - Every submission is manually reviewed

Due to poor quality, we do not accept files from Researchgate

Submitted PDF Full Texts will always be free for everyone
(We only charge for PDFs that we need to acquire)

Select a PDF file:
Close
Close

Related references

Hopcroft, R.L.; Martin, D.O., 2015: The primary parental investment in children in the contemporary USA is education : Testing the Trivers-Willard hypothesis of parental investment. This paper tests the Trivers-Willard hypothesis that high-status individuals will invest more in sons and low-status individuals will invest more in daughters using data from the 2000 to 2010 General Social Survey and the 1979 National Longitudina...

Lavery R.J.; Keenleyside M.H.A., 1990: Parental investment of a biparental cichlid fish cichlasoma nigrofasciatum in relation to brood size and past investment. Parental investiment 'decisions' should consider the value of the current blood relative to the parents' own survival and subsequent reproduction. The influence of blood size and past investment in the existing blood was measured in...

Lavery, RJ.; Keenleyside, MHA., 1990: Parental investment of a biparental cichlid fish, Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum, in relation to brood size & past investment. Parental investiment 'decisions' should consider the value of the current blood relative to the parents' own survival and subsequent reproduction. The influence of blood size and past investment in the existing blood was measured in...

Schneider, N.A.; Griesser, M., 2015: Within-season increase in parental investment in a long-lived bird species: investment shifts to maximize successful reproduction?. In nest-building species predation of nest contents is a main cause of reproductive failure and parents have to trade off reproductive investment against antipredatory behaviours. While this trade-off is modified by lifespan (short-lived species p...

Coleman, R.M.; Gross, M.R., 1991: Parental investment theory: The role of past investment. The role of past investment in parental-care behaviour has often been controversial. Some researchers have argued that organisms basing present investment on past investment are committing the ‘Concorde fallacy’. Others have incorporated life...

Griggio, M.; Carmagnani, C.; Pilastro, A.; Matessi, G., 2003: Male parental investment and quality of female parental care of the rock sparrow. Avocetta, Suppl. (Numero speciale) 27

MØller; Thornhill, 1998: Male parental care, differential parental investment by females and sexual selection. Males play a variable parental role in reproduction, ranging from no male parental care to extensive male care. Females may acquire either direct or indirect fitness benefits from their mate choice, and direct fitness benefits include male parenta...

Olson, V.A.; Webb, T.J.; Freckleton, R.P.; Székely, T., 2009: Are parental care trade-offs in shorebirds driven by parental investment or sexual selection?. Sexual selection, mating systems and parental behaviour are closely linked, although the exact nature of their relationship is controversial. The parental investment hypothesis (PIH) states that parental care disparity drives sexual selection inte...

Smith, C.; Wootton, R.J., 1995: Experimental analysis of some factors affecting parental expenditure and investment in Gasterosteus aculeatus. Parental investment is the cost of providing parental care. Parental investment was measured in the paternal stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, by comparing future survival (measured indirectly as energy content of the body) and growth of parent...

Smith, C.; Wootton, R.J., 1995: Experimental analysis of some factors affecting parental expenditure and investment in Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum. Parental investment is the cost of providing parental care. The short-term cost of parental care was measured in the biparental substrate nesting cichlid, Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum, by comparing the expected future survival (measured indirectly as...