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Poly saccharide synthesis from gdp glucose in pea pisum sativum cultivar alaska epicotyl slices



Poly saccharide synthesis from gdp glucose in pea pisum sativum cultivar alaska epicotyl slices



Journal of Experimental Botany 32(130): 1067-1078



Pea epicotyl slices were incubated with GDP-[14C]glucose (1 .mu.M), and the incorporation of radioactivity into products insoluble in hot 0.5 M NaOH was measured. All the radioactivity in the alkali-insoluble product was present as .beta.-(1 .fwdarw. 4)-linked glucose residues. Evidently, the product was not cellulose since 88% of it was soluble in hot 4.4 M NaOH, it was of relatively low MW and its synthesis was not inhibited by inhibitors of cellulose synthesis. When non-radioactive GDP-mannose (10 .mu.M) was included in incubation medium, the incorporation continued for a longer period, but its initial rate was not increased. Evidently, the product was a glucomannan. Incubation of pea epicotyl slices with 50 .mu.M GDP-[14C]glucose gave products which appeared to include a significant proportion of cellulose: 25% of the product was insoluble in hot 4.4 M NaOH, the incorporation continued up to at least 90 min of incubation, and the product was of higher MW than that from 1 .mu.M GDP-glucose. The tests described permit positive evidence for cellulose biosynthesis in in vitro systems to be obtained.

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Accession: 006141236

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