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Post weanling energy requirements of juvenile pine voles microtus pinetorum



Post weanling energy requirements of juvenile pine voles microtus pinetorum



American Midland Naturalist 108(2): 412-415



Energy intake was measured in 28 juvenile pine voles (M. pinetorum) during postweanling growth (age 22-46 days), maintained at 23.degree. C in a photoperiod of 14L:10D. The average juvenile gained 9.8 g in body mass between 22 and 46 days of age. Intake of metabolic energy was related to age, body mass and rate of growth. The average intake of metabolic energy by a juvenile vole was 11.7 .+-. 0.1 (SE) kcal/day [0.73 .+-. 0.02 (SE) kcal g-1 day-1]. The caloric value of a 1-g gain of the live body mass was estimated to be 2.63 kcal. Efficiency of tissue production was estimated to be 9.2 .+-. 0.6(SE)%.

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Accession: 006153860

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