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Preparation of rigid low density flame retardant polyurethane foams from whey permeate


, : Preparation of rigid low density flame retardant polyurethane foams from whey permeate. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology B Biotechnology 34(1): 52-56

The disposal of whey and whey permeate derived from the cheese industry is a serious economic and environmental problem. Lactose in whey permeate was used to synthesize polyether polyols from which rigid, low-density polyurethane foams were prepared. Resultant foams were comparable to those made from commercially available sucrose-based polyether polyols. Brown-colored lactose polyether polyols are characterized by low viscosity and high carbonyl content. Urea incorporated into these polyether polyols yields flame retardant (self-extinguishing) foams. Urea also reduced the amount of P and/or halogen based fire retardants needed to make the forms non-burning. A preliminary economic analysis indicates that whey-based polyether polyols can be prepared at a cost savings of up to 36% compared to the sucrose counterparts.


Accession: 006173822

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