EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,214,146
Abstracts:
29,074,682
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Relationship between occupied form of nuclear estrogen receptor and cytosolic progesterone receptor of dna synthesis in uteri of estradiol implanted rats






Revista Espanola de Fisiologia 43(4): 401-406

Relationship between occupied form of nuclear estrogen receptor and cytosolic progesterone receptor of dna synthesis in uteri of estradiol implanted rats

The effect of 17 .beta.-estradiol (E2) implantation on the cytosolic progesterone receptor (RcP), DNA and occupied form of nuclear estrogen receptor (o-Rn) content in the uterus of ovariectomized adult rats, is described. Animals were implanted with oil or E2-oil solution in Silastic capsules. The latter group animals were divided into two subgroups: in subgroup (a), capsules remained in situ until decapitation time. In subgroup (b) they were removed 48 h after implantation. The E2 implantation caused a significant increase in uterine weight, RcP and o-Rn content 48 h later. However, the DNA content increased significantly only after 72 h, but there was no significant difference in the t-Rn concentration in relation to the non-estrogenized animals. In subgroup (a) animals, these values remained unchanged until 96 h. In subgroup (b), the removal of E2 implants 48 h later caused an almost complete return of the values before the E2 implantation in terms of uterine weight, RcP and o-Rn content. However, the DNA concentration remained higher and the t-Rn level was lower than those values that were obtained for the non-estrogenized rats. These results suggest that the RcP and DNA synthesis induced by E2 would be connected to the level of o-Rn, although a closer dependency over time seems to exist between the o-Rn and RcP levels than between the o-Rn and DNA concentrations.

(PDF 0-2 workdays service: $29.90)

Accession: 006297908

PMID: 3448706



Related references

Evaluation of the response to tamoxifen on the uterine cytosolic progesterone receptor through the occupied form of the nuclear estrogen receptor. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry 25(SUPPL): 132S, 1986

The nuclear estrogen receptor level and the synthesis of the cytosolic progesterone receptor induced by estradiol. IRCS Medical Science: Library Compendium 11(1): 50-51, 1983

Progesterone regulation of the occupied form of nuclear estrogen receptor. Science 213(4515): 1503-1505, 1981

Occupied and unoccupied nuclear estradiol receptor in human breast tumors relation to estradiol and progesterone cytosol receptors. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry 10(6): 661-668, 1979

Regulation of progesterone receptor messenger rna and protein levels in mcf 7 cells by estradiol analysis of estrogen's effect on progesterone receptor synthesis and degradation. Endocrinology 122(3): 935-944, 1988

The nuclear estrogen receptor in the rat uterus throughout the estrous cycle and its relation to the cytosolic progesterone receptor. IRCS Medical Science: Library Compendium 11(5): 373-374, 1983

Regulation of progesterone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels in MCF-7 cells by estradiol: analysis of estrogen's effect on progesterone receptor synthesis and degradation. Endocrinology 122(3): 935-944, 1988

Effect of progesterone on the activity of occupied nuclear estrogen receptor in vitro. Molecular & Cellular Endocrinology 64(1): 111-118, 1989

Use of an enzymeimmunoassay (EIA) for quantitation of cytosolic and nuclear estrogen receptor, and correlation with progesterone receptor in human breast cancer. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry 28(6): 653-662, 1987

Effect of the antiprogestin RU-486 on progesterone inhibition of occupied nuclear estrogen receptor in the uterus. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry 28(2): 117-122, 1987