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Release of tritiated noradrenaline from the sympathetic nerves to bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels and its modification by alpha agonists and antagonists



Release of tritiated noradrenaline from the sympathetic nerves to bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels and its modification by alpha agonists and antagonists



British Journal of Pharmacology 94(3): 823-833



Isolated segments of bovine mesenteric lymphatic vessels were loaded with [3H]-noradrenaline and its efflux in response to field stimulation examined. Vessels were attached to an isometric force transducer for the simultaneous recording of mechanical activity. Field stimulation of 1, 4 and 8 Hz (0.3 ms pulses, 1 min train) increased spontaneous contraction rate and evoked 3H release up to a maximum of 4.5% of total tissue 3H at 8 Hz. Output per pulse was maximal at 4 Hz. Tetrodotoxin (3 .times. 10-6 M) blocked the release of 3H in response to field stimulation although the drug did not attenuate release evoked by high K+ (65 mM) solution. Field-evoked release of 3H was also absent in Ca2+-free solution containing EGTA (1 mM). When vessels were preincubated with labelled transmitter plus cocaine (5 .times. 10-5 M) evoked release of 3H was absent. After preloading with [3H]-noradrenaline, cocaine (10-6 M) potentiated both the mechanical response to field stimulation and evoked 3H release. The relatively non selective .alpha.-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine (3 .times. 10-6 M) and the .alpha.2-antagonists yohimbine (10-8 M) and rauwolscine (10-6 M) significantly increased evoked 3H release at both of the frequencies examined (1 and 4 Hz). In contrast, the selective .alpha.1-antagonist prazosin (10-6 M) failed to alter 3H release to 4 Hz stimulation although release at 1 Hz was potentiated in the presence of the drug. The postsynaptic excitatory response to field stimulation remained in the presence of prazosin (10-6 M), but was converted to an inhibitory effect in the presence of phentolamine (3 .times. 10-6 M), yohimbine (10-6 M) or rauwolscine (10-6 M). Evoked 3H efflux was significantly reduced by clonidine (10-6 M), xylazine (10-6 M) and exogenous noradrenaline (5 .times. 10-7 M), although phenylephrine (10-6 M) reduced release only at the lower of the two frequencies tested (1 Hz). These findings suggest that release of 3H by field stimulation reflects endogenous transmitter release and that this is subject to autoinhibition via feedback onto inhibitory prejunctional .alpha.2-adrenoceptors. The postjunctional excitatory response is mediated via postjunctional .alpha.2-adrenoceptors.

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Accession: 006306548

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