+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Selective attentional functioning as reflected in event related potentials during syllable discrimination tasks 2. correlations between cognitive deficits and abnormal event related potential findings in schizophrenics



Selective attentional functioning as reflected in event related potentials during syllable discrimination tasks 2. correlations between cognitive deficits and abnormal event related potential findings in schizophrenics



Psychiatria et Neurologia Japonica 87(7): 501-524



This study investigated schizophrenic deficits in information processing, with special reference to disturbances in attentional functioning. ERP [event related potentials] recorded during syllable discrimination tasks, similar to those employed by Hink, et al, were utilized as indexes for estimating disturbances in attentional functioning. Schizophrenics (22- non-medicated, 10; medicated, 12) and 20 normal controls were subjected to this study. Normal controls are the same subjects as reported in the previous study. In syllable discrimination tasks, 4 CV [consonant-vowel] syllables, that is, /ba/, /da/, /ga/, and/za/ in male voice, were presented to 1 ear, with the same 4 CV syllables in female voice being presented to another ear, through headphones, monaurally. Subjects were required to attend to 1 ear, counting a total number of a particular syllable (target syllable) among the 4 syllables. EEG were recorded at the T3, T4, and Cz regions during syllable discrimination tasks. The following results were obtained. Schizophrenics produced smaller amplitudes of the N100 component, as compared to normal controls. The stimuli presented to the attended ear produced larger amplitudes of the N100 component, when compared to the stimuli presented to the non-attended ear in normal controls; however, this condition was not observed in the case of schizophrenics. Amplitudes of the N100 component derived from the T3 (T4) region of normal controls were larger when the stimuli were presented to the ear contralateral to the EEG-deriving side, in comparison to the stimuli presented to the ipsilateral ear. On the other hand, schizophrenics demonstrated larger amplitudes of the N100 component at the T3 region as compared to those of the T4 region, irrespective of the side of stimulus-presentation. Both schizophrenics and normal controls displayed larger amplitudes of the P200 component elicited by the stimuli presented to the non-attended ear, as compared to those of the attended ear. Schizophrenics displayed smaller values of the averaged amplitudes of the LPC, as compared to those of normal controls. The LPC elicited by the target stimuli (defined as the target syllable presented to the attended ear) were larger in comparison to those of the non-target stimuli (non-target syllables presented to the attended ear plus all syllables presented to the non-attended ear) in normal controls; however, there were no significant differences between the LPC elicited by the target stimuli and those of the non-target stimuli in schizophrenics. The non-medicated groups of schizophrenics demonstrated shorter latencies of N100 and P200 components derived from the T3 region as compared to the medicated group, with this group demonstrating nearly equal latencies with the normal controls; there were no significant differences in the latencies of N100 and P200 components derived from the T4 region among these 3 groups. Results seem to suggest that schizophrenics exhibit deficits in the stimulus set, as well as the response set as defined by Broadbent, in information processing. Results also suggest that disturbances of selective attention in schizophrenics are correlated with disturbances in integration mechanisms for both hemispheres, as well as disturbances in the left hemisphere.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 006381966

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

Selective attentional functioning as reflected in ERPs during syllable discrimination tasks. (II). Correlations between cognitive deficits and abnormal ERP findings in schizophrenics. Seishin Shinkeigaku Zasshi 86(7): 501-524, 1984

Disturbances of selective attentional functioning in schizophrenics as shown in abnormalities of event related potentials during dich otic detection tasks. Psychiatria et Neurologia Japonica 85(1): 31-53, 1983

Selective attentional functioning as reflected in ERPs during syllable discrimination tasks (I). Results for normal control subjects. Seishin Shinkeigaku Zasshi 86(2): 120-143, 1984

Early diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's with event-related potentials and event-related desynchronization in N-back working memory tasks. Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine 164: 1-13, 2018

Type A behavior and cognitive processings reflected in event-related brain potentials to concurrent tasks. Shinrigaku Kenkyu 70(4): 293-300, 1999

Event related potentials and selective attentional functioning in siblings of schizophrenic probands. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 60(1): 9P-10P, 1985

Disorders of selective attention in schizophrenics analysis using event related potentials elicited during dich otic listening tasks. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 52(3): S27, 1981

Auditory event-related potentials and attentional processes in chronic schizophrenics. Schizophrenia Research 11(2): 191, 1994

Computed tomographic findings in relation to event-related potentials during visual discrimination tasks in patients with multiple cerebral infarcts. International Journal of Neuroscience 59(4): 281-289, 1991

Attentional processing in adults with ADHD as reflected by event-related potentials. Neuroscience Letters 419(3): 236-241, 2007

What is the validity of an "abnormal" evoked or event-related potential in MS? Auditory and visual evoked and event-related potentials in multiple sclerosis patients and normal subjects. Journal of the Neurological Sciences 109(1): 11-17, 1992

Automatic and effortful processes in auditory memory reflected by event-related potentials. Age-related findings. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 108(4): 361-369, 1998

Age-related changes in event-related potentials in visual discrimination tasks. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 100(4): 299-309, 1996

Are event-related potentials in multiple sclerosis indicative of cognitive impairment? Evoked and event-related potentials, psychometric testing and response speed: a controlled study. Journal of the Neurological Sciences 109(1): 18-24, 1992

Latent inhibition effects reflected in event-related brain potentials in healthy controls and schizophrenics. Schizophrenia Research 20(3): 315-326, 1996