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Spectral analysis of the visual evoked potential effects of stimulus luminance



Spectral analysis of the visual evoked potential effects of stimulus luminance



Psychophysiology 21(6): 665-672



Power spectral analysis was performed on the visual evoked potentials (VEP) of subjects who had participated in an augmenting-reducing study. Six flash luminances were used (0.31, 0.65, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 fL). EEG recordings were taken from C2, O1, O2, T3 and T4 NA scalp locations. Power in 6 frequency ranges was examined (0-2, 2-6, 6-10, 10-14, 14-18 and 18-22 Hz). Power in the lowest 3 frequency ranges increased linearly with stimulus luminance at all electrode sites. Power in the highest 3 ranges increased linearly with luminance at occipital sites only. Power was greater in the left hemisphere than in the right for 18-22 Hz activity recorded at occipital locations. The reverse asymmetry occurred for 6-14 Hz activity recorded at temporal locations. Individual differences in stimulus control in EEG recordings taken from scalp locations overlying nonspecific cortex are apparently due primarily to the contributions of higher frequency components of the VEP spectrum. A thalamo-cortical model of stimulus control is described.

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Accession: 006459469

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