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Storage root development in decapitated radish turnip and sugar beet plants having only cotyledonary leaves



Storage root development in decapitated radish turnip and sugar beet plants having only cotyledonary leaves



Agronomia Lusitana 40(2): 161-176



Plants of mustard [Sinapis alba], radish [Raphanus sativus cv. Scarlet Globe], turnip [Brassica rapa cv. White Globe] and sugar beet [Beta vulgaris] allowed to develop only the cotyledonary leaves survived for > 80 days. Decapitation markedly increased the size and dry matter content of the cotyledons; radish, turnip and sugar beet were able to develop their storage roots. Decapitated radish had a much faster root production rate than the other 2 spp. Root tuberization apparently began slightly earlier in decapitated than in control plants, although it took 50 days longer for the decapitated radish to produce roots of commercial size and dry matter content. In decapitated turnip and sugar beet, GA (10-4 M) increased cotyledon area and the rate of development of cotyledons and roots. Kinetin (10-4 M) did not affect cotyledon area, although it delayed cotyledon senescence while GA3 accelerated it. The action of the 2 hormones on root development was evidently a consequence of their effect on cotyledon growth. Decapitated plants might be useful for studies of root tuberization.

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