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Chapter 6,507

Studies on effect of manure application upon chemical composition and feeding value in forage crops part 1 soiling corn

Taji, K.; Kakihara, H.; Takagi, M.; Hori, Y.; Yano, S.; Ando, N.; Kumai, S.

Grassland Science 22(2): 70-77

1976


ISSN/ISBN: 1744-6961
Accession: 006506652

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The effects of 3 levels of manure and urine applications on the chemical composition and the feeding value of soiling corn (white dent corn) from 1972-1975 were compared. Levels of application per 10 a [acre] during 1 cropping period were: 15,000 kg manure plus 6000 kg urine, 5000 kg manure plus 2000 kg urine and no manure and urine, 23 kg N as ammonium sulfate, 17 kg P2O5 as superphosphate and 24 kg K2O as potassium chloride. Corn was sown at the rate of 10 kg/10 a in 60 cm rows. Digestibility was estimated by the conventional collection digestion trial with sheep. All materials were chopped into 5-7 cm, and fed to sheep as green forage, sun-cured hay or silage. The highest annual dry matter yield was obtained in 1973, while no significant difference was observed between treatments. Crude protein content of the high level plot was the highest throughout experimental years. Crude protein content of the control plot was significantly higher than that of the low level plot in 1972. Crude ash content of all treatments showed a tendency to increase as experimental year advanced. Ca content decreased with increasing manure and urine application. Both K and NO3-N contents increased with increasing manure and urine application. Both K and NO3-N contents increased with increasing manure and urine application, though K content showed a tendency to increase with years. Content of K in the high level plot was significantly higher than that of the control plot in 1975. Nitrate N contents of both high and low levels were significantly higher than that of the control plot in 1974, while that content of the high level plot was significantly higher than those of other plots in 1975. Na content of all treatments showed a tendency to decrease as year advanced. P content of the low level plot was significantly higher than that of other plots in 1973, although those of both high and low level plots were significantly higher than the control plot in 1974 and 1975, respectively. In comparisons with digestibility of each chemical composition in green forage, sun-cured hay and silage, digestibility of crude protein in both high and low level plots was significantly higher than that of the control plots in green forage and sun-cured hay, respectively. Silage qualities of all treatments were excellent.