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Study on the energy requirement of laying hens effect of different energy levels on the laying performance of hen and laying performance by strains of hens



Study on the energy requirement of laying hens effect of different energy levels on the laying performance of hen and laying performance by strains of hens



Korean Journal of Animal Science 22(2): 143-152



To investigate the effect of dietary energy levels on the laying performance of laying hens and the laying performance by strains of laying hens, this experiment was carried out for 350 days with Chuksi 735, Rhode Island Red [RIR] .times. White Leghorn [WL], New Hampshire [NH] .times. RIR and Shaver laying hens from 151-500 days of age. Isoprotein level (15% crude protein) and 3 levels of dietary energy, i.e., 2850 kcal/kg (100% energy), 2565 kcal/kg (90% energy) and 2280 kcal/kg (80% energy) were split into 5 replications. Four strains (Chuksi 735, RIR .times. WL, NH .times. RIR, Shaver) were evenly allocated to a dietary energy level. A total of 600 laying hens were used in this experiment with 50 allocated to each strain. Hen-day egg production rates of 100%, 90% and 80% energy averaged 65-67% and decreased as the dietary energy levels decreased. There were no statistical differences between treatments on the hen-day egg production. Shaver produced 73% egg on the basis of the hen-day egg production and was the highest (P < 0.01) among the strains, followed by Chuksi 735 with 67%, and there were significant (P < 0.01) differences between strains. Egg weight from hens on the 3 energy levels averaged 57.5 g and was not affected by the energy levels. Egg weights produced by Shaver and Chuksi 735 were significantly (P < 0.05) heavier than those produced by cross strains. Diet intake progressively decreased as the energy levels increased. Hens fed 100% energy consumed significantly (P < 0.05) less feed than hens on 80% energy. Shaver and Chuksi 735 of light body weight consumed significantly (P < 0.01) less feed than cross strains of heavy body weight. Feed required/kg egg production generally was 3.12-3.45 kg and increased progressively as energy levels decreased. There were no significant differences between treatments. Shaver and Chuksi 735 of light body weight required significantly (P < 0.01) less feed/kg egg production than cross strains of heavy body weight. In the hen-housed average egg production, Shaver produced 247 and was highest (P < 0.01) among the strains, followed by Chuksi 735 with 231. On the 1st day of 50% egg production, Shaver and Chuksi 735 were slightly (P < 0.05) earlier than cross strains. Economically, crude income per hen was lower with hens on high energy level than those on low energy. Laying performance was not affected by dietary metabolizable energy levels between 2565-2850 kcal/kg of feed. Shaver was the highest of the strains for the laying performance, followed by Chuksi 735.

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