+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Temperature relationship of peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner leaf canopy stem and fruit in soil of varying temperature and moisture



Temperature relationship of peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner leaf canopy stem and fruit in soil of varying temperature and moisture



Peanut Science 12(2): 86-89



Physiological processes of plants are affected by temperature and temperature variation of individual plant parts has been demonstrated to affect such physiological interactions as source-sink relationships. Determination of plant part temperatures in relation to the surrounding environment, especially during stress, may provide significant information relative to how plants respond to various stress environments. To determine peanut plant part temperatures in various environments, rainfall control research plots equipped either with heating cables or cooling coils were utilized to grow Florunner peanuts and implement treatments of various soil temperatures under water stress and irrigated conditions. Peanut stem and pod temperatures were monitored automatically at 2-hr intervals with attached and implanted thermocouples. Canopy temperatures, determined by infrared thermometry, were related to water stress but were apparently unrelated to varying soil temperatures. Late-season, afternoon (1:00 p.m.) canopy temperature in the irrigated treatment averaged 28.5 C and mean canopy temperatures in all water stressed treatments were 35 .+-. 1 C. Late-seasonal plant stem temperature/soil treatment means in irrigated, water stressed-heated soil, water stressed, and water stressed-cooled soil treatments were 21.6 C/21.6 C, 25.2 C/30.2 C, 25.0 C/25.C, and 23.3 C/20.6 C, respectively. Peanut pod temperatures ranged higher and lower than soil temperatures in each plot and maximum pod temperatures often occurred earlier than maximum soil temperature. Concurrent pod, stem, and air maximum and minimum temperatures suggest the strong influence of aerial plant-part temperatures on temperatures of the subterranean fruit. The results of this study show the effect of moisture and temperatures stress on peanut plant part temperatures and demonstrate the relationships which result from the unique subterranean fruiting habit.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 006585205

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

Development of cercosporidium personatum in 3 peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner canopy layers. Peanut Science 7(1): 46-49, 1980

Effect of humic acids on nodulation and dry matter production of soybean glycine max cultivar bragg peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner and clover trifolium vesiculosum cultivar arrow leaf. Soil Science Society of America Journal 47(6): 1121-1124, 1983

Effects of a lime slurry on soil ph exchangeable calcium and peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner yields. Peanut Science 6(2): 73-76, 1979

Photosynthetic response of peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner and soybean glycine max cultivar bragg concentrations. Plant Physiology 72(Suppl. 1): 164, 1983

Controlling canopy formation, flowering, and yield in field-grown stands of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) with ambient and regulated soil temperature. Field Crops Research 81(2/3): 121-132, 2003

Relationship of sampling time to tobacco thrips frankliniella fusca thysanoptera thripidae numbers in peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner foliage buds and flowers. Journal of Economic Entomology 79(5): 1359-1363, 1986

Cyclic uptake of potassium by peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner. Florida Scientist 45(Suppl. 1): 5, 1982

Age specific changes of poly peptides in peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner leaves. Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry 29(6): 1304-1306, 1981

A nondestructive method for determining peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner pod maturity. Peanut Science 8(2): 134-141, 1981

Effect of defoliation on peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner plant growth. Crop Science 24(3): 526-531, 1984

Response of peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner to strains of bradyrhizobium and nitrogen fertilizer. Communications in Soil Science & Plant Analysis 17(5): 497-514, 1986

Purification and characterization of 2 cryo proteins from cultivar florunner peanut arachis hypogaea seed. Plant Physiology 67(4 Suppl.): 48, 1981

Isolation and characterization of 2 cryo proteins from peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner seed. Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry 30(1): 36-41, 1982

Comparison of methods of application with 2 systemic nematicides for control of root knot nematodes in peanut arachis hypogaea cultivar florunner and soybean glycine max cultivar ransom. Nematropica 12(1): 97-110, 1982

Yield and quality response of cultivar florunner peanut arachis hypogaea to applied drought at several growth stages. Peanut Science 12(2): 64-70, 1985