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The effect of t cells on the phagocytosis of malaria parasitized and nonparasitized erythrocytes by macrophages



The effect of t cells on the phagocytosis of malaria parasitized and nonparasitized erythrocytes by macrophages



Dirasat Natural Sciences (Amman) 10(1): 185-196



Because of the similarity between Plasmodium berghei infection in rodents and P. falciparum in humans, the former has been investigated in vitro to try to identify the mechanism of macrophage clearance of parasitized and nonparasitized erythrocytes in malaria. The ability of peritoneal macrophages from acutely infected, normal and immune rodents to ingest erythrocytes before and after coating with immune serum was studied. Macrophage function was enhanced by immune serum in normal and acutely infected rodents (P < 0.05) but not in immune animals. Preincubation of macrophages from each group with T-lymphocytes from immune, normal or acutely infected animals prior to exposure to parasitized erythrocytes was performed in the absence of immune serum, T-lymphocytes from immune rodents enhanced clearance by normal macrophages (P < 0.01), but did not affect phagocytosis in acute or immune macrophages. T-lymphocytes from acutely infected animals also enhanced clearance by normal macrophages (P < 0.05), but not acutely infected macrophages. T-cells had no effect on the ingestion of nonparasitized erythrocytes in any group. Humoral and cell-mediated immune mechanisms were implicated in the enhancement of macrophage function in malaria.

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Accession: 006655935

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