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The lympho toxin system in experimental animals part 2 physical and immunologic characteristics of molecules with lympho toxin activity rapidly released by murine lymphoid cells activated on lectin coated allogeneic mono layers in vitro


Journal of Immunology 123(1): 317-324
The lympho toxin system in experimental animals part 2 physical and immunologic characteristics of molecules with lympho toxin activity rapidly released by murine lymphoid cells activated on lectin coated allogeneic mono layers in vitro
The physicochemical and immunologic properties of cell-lytic molecules released in vitro by nonadherent C57/BL/6 splenocytes or nylon wool-enriched T [thymus-derived] cell populations activated on monolayers of PHA [phytohemagglutinin] coated [mouse fibroblast] L-929 cells were investigated. Cell-lytic molecules released by these lymphoid cells were physically heterogeneous. These molecules were separated by gel filtration into similar MW classes previously observed for human LT [lymphotoxin] molecules. Three major classes, termed complex (Cx) (> 200,000 d [daltons]), .alpha. heavy (.alpha.H) (110,000-140,000 d).alpha. light (.alpha.L) (60,000-90,000 d), and 2 minor classes, .beta., at 40,000-50,000 d and .gamma. at 10,000-20,000 d were observed. Chromatography of supernatants in high ionic strength buffers dissociated Cx and .alpha.H to the smaller MW .alpha.L form. Cx and .alpha.H MW classes are apparently physically related to the smaller MW .alpha.L class. Fractionation of the .alpha.H MW LT class by DEAE or PAGE [polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis] resolved these molecules into additional distinct subclasses. Antisera were made against fresh serum-free whole supernatants (anti-WS) or rechromatographed Ultrogel fractions containing .alpha.H molecules (anti-.alpha.H). Anti-.alpha.H and anti-WS react with all MW classes of murine LT molecules, indicating these various forms are immunologically related. These antisera did not react with LT molecules obtained from several other animal species or with nonspecific intracellular toxins, e.g., lysozomal enzymes, present in normal PMN [polymorphonuclear leukocyte] or phagocytic cells. Materials with cell-lytic activity present in these culture supernatants are apparently LT molecules, because: certain MW forms observed are similar to those reported previously, these various MW forms are all physically and immunologically interrelated. Murine LT molecules like human LT molecules are heterogeneous, but appear to comprise a system of subunits, in which the large MW form may dissociate into the smaller MW forms.


Accession: 006712547



Related references

The LT system in experimental animals. II. Physical and immunologic characteristics of molecules with LT activity rapidly released by murine lymphoid cells activated on lectin-coated allogeneic monolayers in vitro. Journal of Immunology 123(1): 317-324, 1979

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