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The magnetic field of epileptic spikes agrees with intracranial localizations in complex partial epilepsy


Neurology 38(5): 778-786
The magnetic field of epileptic spikes agrees with intracranial localizations in complex partial epilepsy
The magnetoencephalogram (MEG) and electroencephalogram (EEG) were measured during interictal epileptic spikes in nine patients with complex partial seizures. The MEG localization estimates were compared with localizations by intraoperative cortical electrodes, subdural electrodes, stereotaxic depth electrodes, anatomic imaging, postoperative pathologic analysis, and postoperative follow-up. In all patients, MEG localization estimates were in the same lobe as the epileptic focus determined by invasive methods and EEG. In two patients, it was possible to quantify precisely the accuracy of MEG localization by mapping a spike focus that was visually indistinguishable on MEG and cortical recordings. In both patients, MEG localization was approximately 12 mm from the center of the cortical spike focus on intracranial recordings. In eight patients, MEG showed tangential dipolar field patterns on the spontaneous record, but EEG did not. In one patient, a cortical epileptic discharge was detected only on MEG for some discharges and only on EEG for other discharges. The MEG did not detect deep spikes with present levels of environmental noise.


Accession: 006712859

PMID: 3362376



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