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The optimal amino acid supplementation of barley for the growing pig part 1 response of nitrogen metabolism to progressive supplementation


British Journal of Nutrition 41(2): 321-332
The optimal amino acid supplementation of barley for the growing pig part 1 response of nitrogen metabolism to progressive supplementation
In 5 experiments, involving 142 female pigs weighing on average 33 kg, estimates were made of the amounts of essential amino acids which minimized urinary N excretion when diets with barley as the only source of protein were given at the rate of 120 g/kg0.75 per (day). With additions of lysine (4.0 g/kg diet) and threonine (1.2 g/kg diet) to barley urinary N excretion decreased from 0.91-0.36 g/kg0.75 per day, corresponding to an increase in biological value (BV) from 0.51-0.86. With these additions of lysine and threonine, there were no responses to additions of tryptophan, methionine or isoleucine, or to further additions of lysine or threonine, but addition of histidine significantly reduced N excretion. No optimal addition of histidine could be determined; the mean rate of N excretion after addition of histidine (not less than 0.3 g/kg diet) was 0.27 g/kg0.75 per day, corresponding to a BV of 0.93. There was a variation between pigs from different litters in their responses to added histidine. Those with low rates of N excretion on the unsupplemented diet did not respond to additions of histidine, but those with high rates did. Additions of only 3 amino acids can possibly greatly improve the nutritive value of barley protein for the growing pig and the amino acid composition of the supplemented protein closely approaches the ideal; it is also similar to whole-body tissue protein.


Accession: 006728556



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