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The prey and predation behavior of the wasp pison morosum hymenoptera sphecidae






New Zealand Entomologist 11: 37-42

The prey and predation behavior of the wasp pison morosum hymenoptera sphecidae

Pison morosum is a smaller relative of the better known mason wasp P. spinolae. In this, the first published article on its behaviour, evidence is presented to show that P. morosum preys on small, usually immature spiders. It stores them in clay cells in the vacant tunnels of wood-boring beetle larvae. Cell stocking is variable, but many spiders are normally required for each cell. Some overlap in prey taken exists between the 2 species of Pison and so they probably compete to some extent. In its behaviour P. morosum displays an interesting tactic to help capture its main prey-the cobweb spider Achaearanea verculata. It bumps into the web, triggering off the dropping response of the spider, so making the capture easier.


Accession: 006740677

DOI: 10.1080/00779962.1988.9722533



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