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Trehalose absorption related to trehalase in developing ovaries of the silkworm bombyx mori


, : Trehalose absorption related to trehalase in developing ovaries of the silkworm bombyx mori. Journal of Comparative Physiology B Biochemical Systemic & Environmental Physiology 131(4): 333-340

Trehalose absorption was examined in developing ovaries of B. mori Trehalose and glucose absorption followed saturation kinetics giving an apparent Km value of 8.4 mM and a Vmax of 12.5 .mu.moles/30 min/g ovaries for trehalose absorption, and an apparent Km value of 26.4 mM and a Vmax of 36.6 .mu.moles/30 min/g ovaries for glucose uptake. Trehalose absorption was clearly inhibited by addition of NaCN or NaN3 to the incubation medium. Cellobiose, maltose, sucrose and turanose were taken up by ovaries at much lower rates than trehalose. Among the disaccharidases which hydrolyse these sugars, trehalase activity was highest. The correlation between trehalase activity and trehalose absorption rate was demonstrated by a reduction of trehalase activity accompanied by reduced absorption rates after extirpation of the suboesophageal ganglion (SG). During trehalase absorption, glucose was released into the incubation medium, but after SG removal, no liberation of glucose was observed. No accumulation of 14C-trehalose, added to the medium was observed in the cells and almost all radioactivity was recovered as glucose and glycogen in the ovaries. These results suggest that in developing silkworm ovaries, trehalose is absorbed by a specific carrier-mediated and energy-dependent system, in which the hydrolysis by trehalase is an obligatory step.


Accession: 006839075

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Related references

Shimada, S.Y.mashita, O., 1979: Trehalose absorption related with trehalase in developing ovaries of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Journal of comparative physiology31(4): 333-339

Shimada, S.; Yamashita, O., 1979: Trehalose absorption related with trehalose in developing ovaries of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. In most insects, trehalose is the predominant physiological sugar in the haemolymph and serves as a major source of carbohydrates for various tissues. In Bombyx mori (L.), the developing ovaries absorb trehalose from the haemolymph and utilise it...

Kamei, Y.; Hasegawa, Y.; Niimi, T.; Yamashita, O.; Yaginuma, T., 2011: Trehalase-2 protein contributes to trehalase activity enhanced by diapause hormone in developing ovaries of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Diapause hormone (DH) targets developing ovaries in female pupae to induce embryonic diapause immediately after completion of mesoderm segregation of the silkworm, Bombyx mori. At the same time, DH enhances trehalase activity on the oolemma, which...

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Miyadai T.; Yamashita O., 1980: Diapause hormone action in the silkworm bombyx mori lepidoptera bombycidae enhancement of trehalase activity in developing ovaries incubated in vitro. The developing ovary from the pharate adults of the silkworm, B. mori, was incubated in vitro with the modified Wyatt's medium, and the effects of diapause hormone on trehalase activity were surveyed in this system. Trehalase activity increas...

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Yamashita, O.; Hasegawa, K.; Seki, M., 1972: Effect of the diapause hormone on trehalase activity in pupal ovaries of the silkworm, Bombyx mori L. Effect of the diapause hormone on trehalase activity was investigated in the silkworm, Bombyx mori L. Trehalase was located at different activities in various tissues of the pupae, and among the tissues tested ovary trehalase activity alone decrea...

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