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Trend analysis of the percent maximal oxygen consumption heart rate regression


, : Trend analysis of the percent maximal oxygen consumption heart rate regression. Medicine and Science in Sports 8(2): 122-125

A mathematical model of the regression of percent of maximal O2 consumption (% .ovrhdot.VO2 max) on relative (% of max) heart rate (HR) was studied. The 26 subjects (Ss) were classified based on activity levels into high, medium and low-fitness. Each S performed a series of treadmill walks and runs ranging from 30 to 100% of max .ovrhdot.VO2. Percent of .ovrhdot.VO2 max and relative HR were determined during each exercise bout. The data were subjected to a trend analysis utilizing multiple regression techniques. The associated Rs were: linear 0.966, quadratic 0.971, cubic 0.971 and quartic 0.977. The 2nd and 4th order terms statistically accounted for more of the variability than their predecessors but these differences were not of practical significance. There were no statistically significant differences among the fitness subgroup regression slopes or intercepts for any of the sets of regression equations. The bivariate equation was Y = 1.369 .cntdot. X-40.99 (Y = % .ovrhdot.VO2 max and X = relative HR) with a standard error of the estimate of 5.67% .ovrhdot.VO2 max.

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Related references

Swain D.P.; Sammons K.S., 1990: Relationship of percent maximal heart rate and percent maximal oxygen consumption in women. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 22(2 SUPPL): S64

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