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Trends in irrigation development and their implications for hydrologists and water resources engineers


, : Trends in irrigation development and their implications for hydrologists and water resources engineers. Hydrological Sciences Journal 33(1): 43-60

Previous rates of expansion of irrigated areas are not being maintained except possibly in Africa. Reasons for this reduction in the rate of new irrigation development include greater availability of agricultural produce, static or even reduced prices, very high costs of development and maintenance plus severe financial constraints. Concurrently, an increasing number of countries are approaching full development of their surface water resources. This combination of factors dictates new management objectives including: improved system performance, reducing operating costs, increasing production through higher levels of inputs, more emphasis on research and training plus transfer of some operational responsibilities to farmers. Health aspects are likely to assume greater importance as are upstream considerations including watershed hydrology and protection. Key elements to irrigation in Africa have been well identified by the 1986 FAO Consultation on Irrigation in Africa in Lome.

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Accession: 006839400

DOI: 10.1080/02626668809491222

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Related references

Higgins, G.M.; Dieleman, P.J.; Abernethy, C.L., 1987: Trends in irrigation development, and their implications for hydrologists and water resources engineers. Twenty years ago the area of irrigated land was extending rapidly in all continents of the world. In the present decade the rate of this expansion seems to be slowing down. There are at the same time a number of reasons for expecting that in the f...

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