EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,214,146
Abstracts:
29,074,682
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Trends of specialization in pollen of flacourtiaceae with comparative observations of cochlospermaceae and bixaceae


Grana 15(1-3): 29-50
Trends of specialization in pollen of flacourtiaceae with comparative observations of cochlospermaceae and bixaceae
Pollen from 17 genera [Erythrospermum, Streptothamnus, Berberidopsis, Carpotrochi, Mayna, Caloncoba, Lindackeria, Buchnerodendron, Mocquerysia, Azara, Itoa, Cesearia, Samyda, Bixa, Hydnocarpus, Ahernia and Rawsonia] of Flacourtiaceae was examined by (scanning electron microscope) and (transmission electron microscope) TEM; 12 of them represented the primitive tribes Berberidopsideae and Oncobeae. Small, minutely structured grains are widespread in this family, and are often lumped together as 1 morphological type. A study of the relative thickness of the tectal layers, and of the arrangement and size of columellae and perforations, indicates that not all minutely structured grains are homologous in development. Most genera of Berberidopsideae and Oncobeae can be termed microperforate tectate, as the muri are X2-5 as wide as the lumina and both features are less than 1 .mu.m in diameter. Berberidopsis pollen is unique in the Flacourtiaceae in being tricolpate and in having a rough, thick tectum infrequently traversed by microperforations 0.03 .mu. in diameter. Tendencies toward perreticulate structure occur in Mocquerysia. Development of a high infratectal space is illustrated by Casearia nitida and an intectate exine in the related Samyda dodecandra. Pollen of Cochlospermum and Bixa are distinct from Flacourtiaceae and show independent trends of specialization.

(PDF 0-2 workdays service: $29.90)

Accession: 006839600



Related references

Morphology of the flower and pollen in the Cochlospermaceae and Bixaceae. Amer. J. Bot, 55: 6 Part 2, 737, 1968

Flora of ecuador no 20 127 bixaceae 128 cochlospermaceae 130 elatinaceae 131 caricaceae. 1983

Morphology and ecology of seedlings, fruits and seeds of Panama: Bixaceae and Cochlospermaceae. Bulletin of the Natural History Museum Botany series, 24(2): 161-171, 1994

The Bixaceae, Cochlospermaceae, Frankeniaceae, Elatinaceae, Caricaceae, Loasaceae, and Begoniaceae of Peru, their genera and a list of species. Biota, Lima. 8: 63, 125-40, 1970

The comparative morphology of the Cochlospermaceae. III. The flower and pollen. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 59(2): 296-0, 1972

The comparative morphology of the cochlospermaceae part 3 the flower and pollen. Annals of the Missouri Botanical Garden 59(2): 282-296, 1972

Comparative structure and possible trends of specialization of the phloem. Amer Jour Bot 40(1): 9-19, 1953

The comparative morphology and relationships of the Magnoliaceae I Trends of specialization in the stamens. American Journal of Botany 39(7): 484-497, 1952

Observations on the chemotaxonomical aspects of South Indian Bixaceae (s. lat) and Samydaceae. Indian journal of botany 6(2): 190-197, 1983

Pollen morphology of some flacourtiaceae. Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences Plant Sciences 90(2): 163-168, 1981