EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,214,146
Abstracts:
29,074,682
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Trh increases survival in canine hemorrhagic shock


Journal of Surgical Research 40(1): 63-68
Trh increases survival in canine hemorrhagic shock
In our previous work thyroidectomy significantly improved survival in canine hemorrhagic shock. This finding, coupled with the reported beneficial hemodynamic effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in circulatory collapse, led to the present study. Anesthetized, heparinized dogs were bled rapidly into a reservoir until MAP = 40 mm Hg. After 60 min of hypotension (E60) the reservoir line was clamped for 30 min (E90). In 10 dogs three doses of TRH (2 mg/kg) were administered i.v. at 10-min intervals during clamping. In 11 other animals equivalent volumes of saline were given. At E90 the reservoir line was unclamped, and shed blood was reinfused over 30 min. After 1 hr of monitoring (E180) the dogs were returned to the kennel and observed for at least 3 days. Among 11 control dogs, 6 died. In the TRH group only 1 of 10 dogs died (P < 0.05). During uncompensated shock (E60-E90), TRH-treated dogs had significantly higher mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, stroke index, and right and left ventricular stroke work indexes, and arterial pH than control animals. At the conclusion of the acute experiment (E180) there were few intergroup hemodynamic-metabolic differences. The significant enhancement of 3-day survival by TRH in canine hemorrhagic shock might be related to hemodynamic improvement at a critical stage of circulatory collapse (E60-E90). Direct or indirect neuromodulatory actions of TRH on the CNS could also explain our results. These findings lend further support to the potentially key role of hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid interrelationships in shock.

(PDF 0-2 workdays service: $29.90)

Accession: 006839742



Related references

Triiodothyronine increases survival in canine hemorrhagic shock. Resuscitation 15(4): 233-244, 1987

Thyrotropin-releasing hormone increases survival in canine hemorrhagic shock. Journal of Surgical Research 40(1): 63-68, 1986

Verapamil treatment increases survival in a canine model of hemorrhagic shock. Annals Of Emergency Medicine: 1119, 1988

Thyroidectomy improves survival in canine hemorrhagic shock. Surgical Forum (Chicago) 35: 10-12, 1984

Relationship of thyroid hormone patterns to survival in canine hemorrhagic shock. European Surgical Research 16(2): 89-98, 1984

Verapamil pretreatment prolongs survival in a canine model of hemorrhagic shock. Federation Proceedings 46(4): 1428, 1987

Naltrexone improves survival rate and cardiovascular function in canine hemorrhagic shock. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 220(3): 625-628, 1982

Early antioxidant therapy with Tempol during hemorrhagic shock increases survival in rats. Journal of Trauma 53(5): 968-977, 2002

Dose dependent effects of naltrexone on cardiovascular function and survival in canine hemorrhagic shock. Surgical Forum (Chicago) 35: 19-21, 1984

Mild hypothermia increases survival from severe pressure-controlled hemorrhagic shock in rats. Journal of Trauma 50(2): 253-262, 2001