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Triassic liassic deposits of morocco and eastern north america comparison






AAPG (American Association of Petroleum Geologists) Bulletin 61(1): 79-99

Triassic liassic deposits of morocco and eastern north america comparison

Late Triassic to middle Liassic (Early Jurassic) basin deposits in Morocco are mainly red-bed-evaporite sequences. Essentially coeval deposits in eastern North America comprise detrital sequences along the inner Alleghenian-Acadian belt, and evaporites on the outer continental margin. Reconstruction of the North Atlantic basin implies that Late Triassic-Liassic salt accumulated largely on continental crust, before appreciable opening of the Mid-Atlantic rift, and that no salt accumulated in the North Atlantic realm after Liassic time. [The sparse Moroccan fossils included estheriids, fish, amphibians, reptiles and pelecypods.].


Accession: 006840754



Related references

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