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Ventilatory adaptations to resistive loading during wakefulness and non rapid eye movement sleep



Ventilatory adaptations to resistive loading during wakefulness and non rapid eye movement sleep



Journal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental & Exercise Physiology 52(3): 607-614



Ventilatory and timing responses to repetitive and sustained inspiratory resistive loading were assessed in 6 naive men during wakefulness (AW) and non-REM sleep (NREM; non-rapid-eye-movement). In 5 of 6 subjects tidal volume (VT) was maintained or increased with repetitive 5-breath loading periods during wakefulness. In these 5 subjects mouth occlusion pressure (P100) increased with loading during AW (1.8 .+-. 0.5 control vs. 2.2 .+-. 0.4 cm H2O loaded, P < 0.05) but not during NREM (2.1 .+-. 1.5 control vs. 2.1 .+-. 1.5 cm H2O loaded). For each state, VT and frequency (f) responses, to sustained loads were similar to responses to 5-breath loads. During sustained loading VT increased 35% during AW and decreased 28% during NREM, f decreased 35% during AW and increased 6% during NREM, and minute ventilation (.ovrhdot.VE) decreased 12% during AW and decreased 23% during NREM. Ventilatory responses persisted until arousal (0.4-1.7 min) in NREM. With repetitive loading inspiratory duration (TI) increased during AW but did not change during NREM; duty cycle (TI/TT) increased with loading in both states. Apparently, NREM abolishes between-breath augmentations in P100, within-breath load compensation is operant during both AW (preserved VT) and NREM (failure of predicted TI prolongation) by differing mechanisms, and arousal may be a ventilatory compensation to inspiratory resistive loading in NREM.

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