+ Site Statistics
References:
54,258,434
Abstracts:
29,560,870
PMIDs:
28,072,757
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Arachidonate metabolism in the anterior pituitary: effect of arachidonate inhibitors on Basal and stimulated secretion of prolactin, growth hormone and luteinizing hormone. I. Hormone release from incubated or perifused pituitary fragments



Arachidonate metabolism in the anterior pituitary: effect of arachidonate inhibitors on Basal and stimulated secretion of prolactin, growth hormone and luteinizing hormone. I. Hormone release from incubated or perifused pituitary fragments



Journal of Neuroendocrinology 2(4): 439-444



The potential involvement of arachidonic acid metabolites in the regulation of adenohypophyseal secretion was analysed on pituitary glands from male rats incubated in the presence of various inhibitors with different mechanisms of action: two inhibitors of phospholipase A2 (parabromophenacylbromide, PB and compound CB 874), an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase- and lipoxygenase- catalysed pathways (5, 8, 11, 14-eicosatetraynoic acid, ETYA) and an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (.epsilon.-lysyl acetylsalicylate, ASP). Under conditions which minimize side effects of the drugs, all inhibitors reduced prostaglandin synthesis and release, without affecting the metabolic integrity of the tissues (assessed by their intracellular adenosine trisphosphate levels). All agents tested (PB, ETYA, ASP) suppressed prolactin secretion induced either by thyrotropin-releasing hormone or vasoactive intestinal peptide. Basal prolactin secretion was sensitive to phospholipase A2 inhibitors. Similar inhibitions were obtained with ETYA and CB 874 on growth hormone secretion under basal conditions as well as after stimulation by growth hormone-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, or vasoactive intestinal peptide. In contrast, luteinizing hormone secretion, stimulated or not by gonadotropin-releasing hormone, was not sensitive to any of the agents used. It is concluded that, in intact male hemipituitaries, arachidonic acid metabolism is involved in the stimulation of prolactin and growth hormone secretion by neuropeptides. In contrast, luteinizing hormone release does not seem to depend on that mechanism. It has been verified that the inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism do not directly interfere with adenylate cyclase, or with the activation of protein kinase C, two enzymes which are involved in the regulation of secretory mechanisms.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 007033508

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 19215371

DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2826.1990.tb00430.x


Related references

Arachidonate Metabolism in the Anterior Pituitary: Effect of Arachidonate Inhibitors on Basal and Stimulated Secretion of Prolactin, Growth Hormone and Luteinizing Hormone. II. Hormone Release from Dispersed Pituitary Cells. Journal of Neuroendocrinology 2(4): 445-452, 1990

Effect of 3-hydroxy-4-1(H)pyridone on the basal and thyrotropin-releasing hormone-stimulated release of thyroid-stimulating hormone from perifused anterior pituitary fragments. Life Sciences 41(13): 1645-1650, 1987

Role of arachidonate metabolism on the in vitro release of luteinizing hormone and prolactin from the anterior pituitary gland: possible involvement of lipoxygenase pathway. Neuroendocrinology 43(3): 428-434, 1986

Role of Arachidonate Metabolism on the in vitro Release of Luteinizing Hormone and Prolactin from the Anterior Pituitary Gland: Possible Involvement of Lipoxygenase Pathway. Neuroendocrinology 43(3): 428-434, 1986

Effect of cortisol on the basal and gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulated release of luteinizing hormone from incubated bovine pituitary cells. Journal Of Animal Scienceppl. 1: 298, 1980

The self-priming effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone on luteinizing hormone release: observations using rat anterior pituitary fragments and dispersed cells continuously perifused in parallel. Endocrinology 114(3): 861-867, 1984

Estrous cycle stage-dependent effects of neuropeptide-Y on luteinizing hormone (LH)-releasing hormone-stimulated LH and follicle-stimulating hormone secretion from anterior pituitary fragments in vitro. Endocrinology 133(6): 2413-2417, 1993

Modulation of prolactin luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone secretion by luteinizing hormone releasing hormone and bromocriptine cb 154 in the hypophysectomized pituitary grafted male rat and its effect on testicular luteinizing hormone receptors and testosterone output. Biology of Reproduction 21(1): 141-148, 1979

Pyrularia thionin increases arachidonate liberation and prolactin and growth hormone release from anterior pituitary cells. Toxicon 30(12): 1563-1573, 1992

Calcium dependence of gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion in vitro studies using continuously perifused dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells. Endocrinology 113(2): 557-562, 1983

Dynamic characteristics of luteinizing hormone release from perifused sheep anterior pituitary cells stimulated by combined pulsatile and continuous gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Endocrinology 117(1): 169-179, 1985

Effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase- activating polypeptide on the release of growth hormone , luteinizing hormone , and prolactin from cultured bovine anterior pituitary cells in vitro. Animal Science & Technology 65(11): 993-998, 1994

Growth hormone releasing factor increases release of growth hormone and arachidonate from anterior pituitary cells. American Journal of Physiology 248(4 PART 1): E438-E442, 1985

Effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on the release of growth hormone (GH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and prolactin (PRL) from cultured bovine anterior pituitary cells in vitro. Animal Science and Technology 65(11): 993-998, 1994

When luteinizing hormone releasing hormone was used to induce luteinizing hormone release immunoactive luteinizing hormone recovered in perfusion effluents was significantly less than such luteinizing hormone which disappeared from rat anterior pituitary tissues. Federation Proceedings 36(3): 367, 1977