EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
52,725,316
Abstracts:
28,411,598
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on Google+Follow on Google+
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

Changes in astroglial scar formation in rat optic nerve as a function of development


Journal of Comparative Neurology 296(3): 359-378
Changes in astroglial scar formation in rat optic nerve as a function of development
Although astroglial scar formation is a common response to almost any type of injury to the adult central nervous system, lesions in fetal and neonatal rats have been reported to induce little or no scar formation. To examine this developmental difference further, rats ranging in age from 1 to 65 days postnatal were unilaterally enucleated, a surgical procedure that causes the axons in the optic nerve to degenerate. The optic nerves were processed for light and electron microscopy at times ranging from 7 to 365 days postenucleation. Pronounced and permanent glial scars were formed in every age group examined, including the neonates. However, the time course for removal of the degenerating axonal debris and formation of a compact, debris-free glial scar varied as a function of developmental age. In neonatal rats, a compact glial scar formed in 1-2 weeks whereas 3-5 months were required for compact glial scar formation in juveniles and adults. Changes in cross-sectional area were also associated with optic nerve degeneration and glial scar formation. Whereas lesioned neonatal optic nerves underwent little change in area, there was a substantial decrease in area in the juvenile and adult. Morphometric analysis showed that irrespective of the age of the animal at the time of enucleation, the final area of the compact glial scar was 10-20% of the unlesioned adult control. These results suggest that conflict in the literature over the ability of neonatal astrocytes to form a glial scar may be due to the nature of the lesion or the method of detection since astrocytes in the neonatal rat optic nerve clearly have the capacity to become reactive and form a glial scar.

Accession: 007091357

PMID: 2358542

DOI: 10.1002/cne.902960303

Download PDF Full Text: Changes in astroglial scar formation in rat optic nerve as a function of development



Related references

Compact astroglial scar formation does occur in newborn and neonatal rat optic nerves following retinal enucleation. Anatomical Record 223(4): 116A-117A, 1989

Development of astroglial elements in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the rat: with special reference to the involvement of the optic nerve. Experimental Neurology 166(1): 44-51, 2000

Spongioblastoma of the optic nerve with normal eye function; case contribution to the problem of intracranial development of tumor of the optic nerve. Klinische Monatsblatter für Augenheilkunde und für Augenarztliche Fortbildung 125(5): 591-594, 1954

Morphology of the nerve scar and its significance for restoration of the function of regenerating nerve. (Apropos of P.K. Anokhin's "Physiological Theory of the Nerve Scar"). Arkhiv Patologii 23(10): 81-87, 1961

A study of degeneration, scar formation and regeneration after section of the optic nerve in the frog, Rana pipiens. Journal of Anatomy 133(Pt 2): 213-225, 1981

Transgenic inhibition of astroglial NF-κB protects from optic nerve damage and retinal ganglion cell loss in experimental optic neuritis. Journal of Neuroinflammation 9(): 213-213, 2013

A temporal study of axonal degeneration and glial scar formation following a standardized crush injury of the optic nerve in the adult rat. Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience 22(1): 1-10, 2004

Transgenic inhibition of astroglial NF-kappaB protects from optic nerve damage and retinal ganglion cell loss in experimental optic neuritis. 2012

The role of transforming growth factor beta in scar formation in the injured non-regenerating and regenerating optic nerve. Journal of Endocrinology 163(SUPPL ): P37, Nov, 1999

Involvement of aquaporin-4 in astroglial cell migration and glial scar formation. Journal of Cell Science 118(Pt 24): 5691-5698, 2005