+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Comparing analysis of bean seeds on incidence by the causal agent of halo blight pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola burkholder young et al. by different identification methods i. detection by isolation on bacterial nutrient media and serological methods



Comparing analysis of bean seeds on incidence by the causal agent of halo blight pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola burkholder young et al. by different identification methods i. detection by isolation on bacterial nutrient media and serological methods



Zentralblatt fuer Mikrobiologie 143(7): 487-498



The halo blight of beans is one of the most important seedborne diseases of vegetables. Thus, by ascertainment of the number of bean seeds being attacked or contaminated by the causal agent of this bacteriosis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, and elimination of lots containing such infested seeds, the transmission can be interrupted. The most used methods for testing bean seeds described in literature are compiled. By comparing experiments following results could be obtained: Precultivation of seed samples in tap water containing penicillin G (17,000 IE/1), novobiocin (45 ppm) and cycloheximide (45 ppm) did not enough inhibit the saprophytic organisms frequently occurring in bean seeds; among them Pseudomonas putida and Erwinia herbicola could be identified. However, submerging and shaking of bean seeds in sterile tap water (6 h, 22 .degree.C) allows a sure detection of pathogen cells. Out 13 media under test, nutrient agar containing saccharose (5%) (NASA), NASA + crystal violet (2 ppm) described by ERCOLANI and CROSSE (1966), King's agar B and a modification of this one (King's agar BF) were most suitable for isolating and identifying colonies of Ps. syringae pv. phaseolicola. On this way still < 102 cells of the causal agent/ml rinsing water can be determined. The pathogen could also be very well discovered by an immunofluorescence technique. By this method the seed rinsing water must contain nearly 105 cells/ml for a extract detection. If collecting samples containing 100 seeds were used, results completely agreeing with the agar test could be obtained. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was also successfully used for identifying the causal agent in rinsing water. By this technique a minimal concentration of 105 cells/ml is necessary for detection. However, testing of collecting samples containing 100 seeds brought the equal results like agar tests.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 007137820

Download citation: RISBibTeXText


Related references

Comparative analysis of bean seeds on incidence of the causal agent of halo blight, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Burkholder) Young et al., by different identification methods. I. Detection by isolation on bacterial nutrient media and serological methods. Zentralblatt fur Mikrobiologie 143(7): 487-498, 1988

Comparing analysis of bean seeds on incidence by the causal agent of halo blight pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola burkholder young et al. by different identification methods ii. detection by biological tests. Zentralblatt fuer Mikrobiologie 143(7): 499-509, 1988

Comparative analysis of bean seeds on incidence of the causal agent of halo blight, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Burkholder) Young et al., by different identification methods. II. Detection by biological tests. Zentralblatt fur Mikrobiologie 143(7): 499-509, 1988

The causal agent of halo blight in bean, Pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola, attaches to stomata via its pili. Microb Path 1(2): 139-148, 1986

Analysis of bean seed samples from the field for contamination with the halo blight pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Burkholder) Young et al. Archiv fur Gartenbau 37(6): 383-392, 1989

Pseudomonas syringae pathovar oryzae new pathovar causal agent of bacterial halo blight of rice. Annals of the Phytopathological Society of Japan 51(2): 212-218, 1985

Evaluation of two serological methods for identification of halo blight pathogen (Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola) of beans. Journal of Turkish Phytopathology 22(2-3): 75-84, 1993

The causal agent of halo blight in bean, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, attaches to stomata via its pili. Microbial Pathogenesis 1(2): 139-148, 1986

Bacteriophages in the biological control of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, causal agent of halo blight in bean. Ecosistemas y Recursos Agropecuarios 5(14): 191-202, 2018

Contribution to the study of string bean and bean susceptibility to pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola burkholder young dye et wilkie. Zastita Bilja 41(4): 431-453, 1990

Testing inoculation methods and sources of resistance to the halo blight bacterium pseudomonas syringae pathovar phaseolicola in phaseolus vulgaris. Euphytica 33(1): 133-142, 1984

Direct detection of the halo blight pathogen pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola in bean seeds by dna amplification. Phytopathology 81(10): 1159, 1991

Identification of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola as the causal agent of halo blight in yellow beans in northern Sinaloa, Mexico. Phytoparasitica 44(3): 369-378, 2016

Pseudomonas phaseolicola Burkholder (Dowson) (Ps. syringae pv. phaseolicola (Burkholder) Young, Dye & Wilkie) as a parasite of string bean and bean. Zastita Bilja 35(3): 283-291, 1984

Comparison of serological methods for identification and detection of the causal agent of bean common bacterial blight in bean seed in Markazi Province. Iranian Journal of Plant Pathology 38(3/4): Pe193-206, en77-79, 2002