+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Context availability and the recall of abstract and concrete words



Context availability and the recall of abstract and concrete words



Memory & Cognition 20(1): 96-104



Predictions of an automatic-imagery, strategic-imagery, and context-availability hypothesis of concreteness effects in free recall were examined. In each experiment, recall of abstract and concrete words controlled for rated context availability was compared with the typical situation in which context availability is confounded with imageability. In Experiment 1, a direct intentional-recall task produced concreteness effects in recall. Experiment 2 compared concreteness effects in recall following three orienting tasks: imagery rating, context-availability-controlled condition were found following the imagery-rating and the directed intentional-memory tasks, but not after the context-availability-rating task. In Experiment 3, subjects reported the strategies that they used to encode the list. Subjects reporting an imagery strategy showed concreteness effects for words controlled for rated context availability, but those not reporting it did not. These results support a strategic-imagery view for concreteness effects in free recall.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 007155645

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

PMID: 1549068

DOI: 10.3758/bf03208259


Related references

Concrete words are easier to recall than abstract words: Evidence for a semantic contribution to short-term serial recall. Journal of Experimental Psychology Learning Memory & Cognition 25(5): 1256-1271, 1999

Concreteness, context availability, and imageability ratings and word associations for abstract, concrete, and emotion words. Behavior Research Methods 31(4): 578-602, 1999

Concreteness, context availability, and imageability ratings and word associations for abstract, concrete, and emotion words. Behavior Research Methods Instruments and Computers 31(4): 578-602, 1999

Beyond the abstract-concrete dichotomy: mode of acquisition, concreteness, imageability, familiarity, age of acquisition, context availability, and abstractness norms for a set of 417 Italian words. Behavior Research Methods 42(4): 1042-1048, 2010

Free recall of concrete and abstract words in poor and normal readers. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 39(2): 363-380, 1985

Comprehension of concrete and abstract words in autistic children. Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders 20(1): 61-74, 1990

The acquisition of concrete, abstract, and emotion words in a second language. International Journal of Bilingualism 16(4): 446-452, 2012

Neural pathways involved in the processing of concrete and abstract words. Human Brain Mapping 7(4): 225-233, 1999

Functional differences in the semantic processing of concrete and abstract words. Neuropsychologia 39(10): 1086-1096, 15 August, 2001

Semantic priming with abstract and concrete words: differential asymmetry may be postlexical. Brain and Language 31(1): 43-60, 1987

Rapid and slow brain systems of abstract and concrete words differentiation. International Journal of Psychophysiology 65(3): 272-283, 2007

Two semantic brain systems of rapid and slow differentiation of abstract and concrete words. Zhurnal Vysshei Nervnoi Deyatel'nosti Imeni Ivlova. 2007; 57(5): 566-575, 2007

Effects of videotaped violence on hypermnesia for imaginally encoded concrete and abstract words. Perceptual and Motor Skills 80(2): 467-477, 1995

Spatial and frequency differences of neuromagnetic activities in processing concrete and abstract words. Brain Topography 20(3): 123-129, 2008

Effects of spatial context on free recall of categorized words. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20(3): 140, 1982