Evaluation of growth characters in the progeny of different parent trees in seeds stands of norway spruce picea abies l. karst

Humlova, M.

Lesnictvi 38(1): 3-16

1992


Accession: 007319515

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Abstract
In 1980, the first stands were planted in Slovakia [Czechoslovakia] to preserve and reproduce the most valuable autochthonous populations of the main forest species. In some seed stands of Norway spruce, areas were laid down where differences in the growth in identical conditions of a nursery and later on, after they were planted on the open area. Areas with separated plantings of progenies were established in seed stands at Benus (900 m a.sl.l). Ciemy balog (970 m a.s.l.), Liptovsky Hradok (950 m a.s.l.), Orvasky Podzamok (920 m a.s.l.) and Brezno (1200 m a.s.l.), replacing parent stands from which the seed was obtained. Plants grown from the seed of one parent tree (bearing the number of the tree from which the seed was obtained) were set on 5 .times. 5m plots, 12 plants on each in multiple replications. The growth characters were evaluated for the first time in four years old plants when they were lifted from the nursery and replanted to the open areas, and then 3 to 5 years later when they were cultivated on these areas. The characters evaluated were diameter in the root neck, height, diameter and height increments over the period of observation. The significance of differences in height and diameter growth between the progenies within the parent stand was tested by means of analysis of variance, the significance of differences between the progenies of particular trees by Tuckey's test. The average values of the growth characters of progenies of particular parent trees on the target areas are given in Tabs, I to V. The differences in the mean diameter increments of the progenies of particular trees within the parent stand were not statistically significant on any area (Tabs, VI to X). At the time of replanting, there were statistically significant differences in the mean heights of the progenies of parent stand trees on all target areas (Tabs, VI -X). When the plants were grown three to five years on the areas, the significance of differences in the mean heights between the progenies of different trees was proved statistically on only two areas (Tabs. IX, X). On the remaining areas the differences in the heights of the progenies of different trees were not statistically significant any more (Tabs. VI-VIII). As the plants were growing on the target areas, the mean heights of the progenies of particular trees became more or less equable because the progenies with the greatest height advantage often had the smallest height increment and vice versa. For example on the area at Benus, the replanted progenies of trees 1, 5 and 11 that had the greatest mean height, were much more advanced if compared with the other progenies. These differences were statistically highly significant as indicated by Tuckey's test (Tab. XI). Five years later, the differences in the mean heights of the progenies of different parent trees grown on the target area were not statistically significant any more (Tab. VI). The mean heights of the progenies of particular trees became more or less equable because the progenies with the smaller height at the time of planting (25, 34, 35, 36) had greater mean height increments when grown on the areas (the progeny of tree 34 had the greater height than the progeny of tree 5) - Tab. I. On the area at C. Balog, the significance of differences in the mean heights of the progenies of particular trees was statistically significant only at the time when the plants were lifted from the nursery, at the time of their replacing (Tab. VII). The progeny of tree 10 due to its greatest height was somewhat different from the other progenies; this was statistically confirmed by Tuckey's test (Tab. XII). Three years later, when the progenies were growing on the target area, the heights of the progenies became equable (the progeny of tree 10 had the least height increment of all the progenies) and the results of the analysis of variance did not confirm any statistically significant difference (Tab. II, VII). The results of testing the differences in the mean heights of the progenies of particular trees are most interesting on the area at Brezno, where the progenies of the greatest number of parent trees were evaluated. In the plants lifted from the nursery, the results of testing (Tab. XIV) confirmed the statistically highly significant differences in the mean heights of the progenies of particular trees (5, 6, 18, 21, 28, 31, 33, 36). When the plants were replanted, the progenies of trees 33 and 36 having the greatest mean height, and the progenies of tree 21 having the smallest mean height (most of the investigated progenies had more than twofold mean heights than the progeny of the latter tree) were most different from the other ones. Three years later when the plants were grown on the target area, the differences in the mean heights of the progenies of particular trees became equable, a statistically significant difference was proved only in the progeny of tree 21. The progeny of these trees w as different as to its height only from the progenies of two trees (6 and 33) which had the greatest height of all progenies evaluated (Tab. XVI). The significance of differences in the height increments of the progenies of particular trees within the parent stand was confirmed statistically only on the area at Or. Podzamok. The results of F-test did not show any statistically significant differences on the other areas (Tabs. VI to X).