Fate and interaction with native soil nitrogen of ammonium nitrogen applied to wetland rice oryza sativa l. grown under saline and non saline conditions

Azam, F.; Asharf, M.; Lodhi, A.; Sajjad, M.I.

Biology and Fertility of Soils 13(2): 102-107

1992


ISSN/ISBN: 0178-2762
DOI: 10.1007/bf00337343
Accession: 007344761

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Abstract
The effect of salts on the balance of fertilizer N applied as 15N-labelled ammonium sulphate and its interaction with native soil N was studied in a pot experiment using rice (Oryza sativa L.) as a test crop. The rice crop used 26%-40% of the applied N, the level of applied N and salts showing no significant bearing on the uptake of fertilizer N. Losses of fertilizer N ranged between 54% and 68% and only 5%-8% of the N was immobilized in soil organic matter. Neither the salts nor the rate of N application had any significant effect on fertilizer N immobilization. The effective use of fertilizer N (fertilizer N in grain/fertilizer N in whole plant) was, however, better in the non-saline soil. The uptake of unlabelled N (N mineralized from soil organic matter and that originating from biological N2 fixation in these rhizosphere) was inhibited in the presence of the salts. However, in fertilized soil, the uptake of unlabelled N was significantly enhanced, leading to increased A values [(1-% Ndff/% Ndff) .times. N fertilizer applied, where Ndff is N derived from fertilizer], an index of interaction with the added N. This added N interaction increased with increasing levels of added N. Since the extra unlabelled N taken up by fertilized plants was greater than the fertilizer N immobilized, and the root biomass increased with increasing levels of added N, a greater part of the added N interaction was considered to be real, any contribution by an apparent N interaction (pool substitution or isotopic displacement) to the total calculated N interaction being fairly small. Under saline conditions, for the same level of fertilizer N addition, the added N interaction was lower, and this was attributed to a lower level of microbial activity, including mineralization of native soil N, root-driven immobilization of applied N, and N2 fixation.

Fate and interaction with native soil nitrogen of ammonium nitrogen applied to wetland rice oryza sativa l. grown under saline and non saline conditions