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Foliar absorption and translocation of dicamba from aqueous solution and dicamba treated soil deposits



Foliar absorption and translocation of dicamba from aqueous solution and dicamba treated soil deposits



Weed Technology 6(1): 57-61



This study was conducted to compare foliar absorption and translocation of dicamba applied to plants as an aqueous solution or as dicamba-treated soil deposits. When applied as an aqueous solution, 65 to 95% of 14C-dicamba was absorbed by pea, alfalfa, and grape [Pisum sativum, Medicago sativa, Vitis vinifera]; whereas, limited absorption (0.4 to 4.7%) occurred from dicamba-treated soil. Based on dose-response evaluation, the low levels absorbed from treated soil are unlikely to cause crop damage. 14C-dicamba translocation was more than 80% of absorbed 14C in pea, alfalfa, grape. Acropetal translocation exceeded basipetal translocation.

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Accession: 007356354

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DOI: 10.2307/3987164


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