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Iron retention in tissues and carcass of rats during growth and under different oral and parenteral supply of iron as iron iii hydroxide polymaltose



Iron retention in tissues and carcass of rats during growth and under different oral and parenteral supply of iron as iron iii hydroxide polymaltose



Journal of Animal Physiology & Animal Nutrition 65(2): 96-109



Growth rates, hematological parameters and iron retention in various body tissues and in the carcass were determined in rats initially weighing 67 g. In Experiment 1, patterns of iron retention during growth and under adequate iron supply (40 ppm) were determined applying the comparative slaughter technique. Groups of five animals each were dissected at day 0, 6, 10, 14, 18 and 22 of the experiment. In Experiment 2, a 3.6 ppm Fe diet supplemented with 0, 40 or 400 ppm Fe was fed to a total of 30 rats for 20 days. Half of the animals initially received an intravenous dose of 2.72 mg Fe. Fe(III)-hydroxide-polymaltose was used as the only iron compound for all iron supplementations. In both experiments, the diets containing 40 ppm Fe allowed maximum growth and physiological levels of hematological parameters without elevated deposition of iron at storage sites. In Experiment 1, the daily rate of iron retention was on average about 150 .mu.g. The total body iron contents increased from 2.9 mg at 67 g of live-weight to 6.0 mg at 174 g of live-weight. Without any iron supplementation during the 20 days of Experiment 2, hypochromic, microcytic iron deficiency anemia developed without however noticeably affecting growth rates. The 40 ppm diet providing a total ad libitum intake of 6.9 mg Fe in Experiment 2 was more efficient against deficiency than a single i.v. dose of 2.7 mg Fe. Excessive iron supplied orally or i.v. did not affect hematological criteria with the exception of plasma iron, and was stored at the typical body sites. Plasma iron concentration significantly correlated with iron content of carcass, liver spleen and femur even with excessive supply. Each percent increase in plasma iron concentration as related to the value obtained with adequate iron supply was equivalent to an increase of 0.66 percent in body iron content. The average total iron contents of the finally about 160 g weighing rats were 2.1 mg without supplementation, 5.3 mg with adequate oral iron, and up to 8.2 mg with excessive iron.

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