+ Site Statistics
+ Search Articles
+ PDF Full Text Service
How our service works
Request PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedIn
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
Most Shared
PDF Full Text
+ Translate
+ Recently Requested

Low glucosinolate rapeseeds and rapeseed meals effect of technological treatments on chemical composition digestible energy content and feeding value for growing pigs



Low glucosinolate rapeseeds and rapeseed meals effect of technological treatments on chemical composition digestible energy content and feeding value for growing pigs



Animal Feed Science & Technology 30(3-4): 175-192



Twenty-nine samples of rapeseed meal; 8 of the zero normal type (RSM 0), 21 of double zero (RSM 00) low-glucosinolate type, and 1 of the whole rapeseed (RS 00) were tested. Their digestible energy (DE) content and apparent digestibility ( AD) of crude protein were measured by the difference procedure. In addition, 370 growing-finishing pigs (30-100 kg liveweight) were used to assess the effect on feeding value of the cultivar and soil extraction process of 15 samples only, included at 10-25% of a diet based on maize or wheat. The DE values (MJ kg-1 dry matter (DM)) and AD (%) of crude protein were 13.4 and 74.3 vs. 14.0 and 80.2 for RSM 0 and RSM 00, respectively; 16.5 and 85.1 for dehulled RSM 00; 17.9 and 84.3, and 15.3 and 87.5 for single and double expeller-extracted RSM 00, respectively, and 22.8 and 83.7 for the whole RS 00. The average performance of animals was lower with RSM 0 or RSM 00 treated with inappropriate technology including overheating. Addition of lysine improved growth performance. Weights of thyroid and liver were linearly (r = +0.75, r = 0.78, respectively) related to the amount of glucosinolate ingested by the pigs. Progress in plant breeding and technological processing indicated a promising future for the utilisation of low-glucosinolate RSM in pig feeding.

Please choose payment method:






(PDF emailed within 0-6 h: $19.90)

Accession: 007524865

Download citation: RISBibTeXText

DOI: 10.1016/0377-8401(90)90014-y


Related references

Effect of physico-chemical treatments on glucosinolate content of various rapeseed-mustard meals. Indian Journal of Animal Nutrition 17(3): 211-216, 2000

Effect of method of determination on digestible energy and nitrogen and on metabolizable energy values of rapeseed meal and soybean meals fed to growing pigs. Canadian Journal of Animal Science. 51: 2, 427-432, 1971

Predicting the Digestible Energy of Rapeseed Meal from Its Chemical Composition in Growing-finishing Pigs. Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 25(3): 375-381, 2012

Digestible and metabolizable energy values for rapeseed meals and for soybean fed to growing pigs. Canadian journal of animal science: 51 (2) 419-425, 1971

New rapeseeds with a low glucosinolate content: chemical composition and nutritive value of oilmeals and seeds for pigs. Productions Animales 2(4): 267-273, 1989

Digestible and metabolizable energy values for rapeseed meals and for soybean meal fed to growing pigs. Canadian Journal of Animal Science. 51: 2, 419-425, 1971

Evaluation of solvent extracted meals from winter rapeseed differing in the glucosinolate content with pigs in consideration of iodine supply 1. on the characterization of rapeseed meals and on fattening results. Archives of Animal Nutrition 40(9): 841-854, 1990

Nutritional value of wheat for growing pigs: chemical composition and digestible energy content. Canadian Journal of Animal Science 79(2): 187-194, 1999

Predicting corn digestible and metabolizable energy content from its chemical composition in growing pigs. Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology 5(1): 11, 2014

The prediction of the digestible energy content of foodstuffs for growing pigs through knowledge of chemical composition. Animal Science 62(3): 659, 1996

The digestible energy content of fish meals fed to growing/finishing pigs. Fish Meal Flyer (9): 8, 1985

Prediction of the digestible and metabolizable energy content of wheat milling by-products for growing pigs from chemical composition. Animal Feed Science and Technology 196: 107-116, 2014

Determination and prediction of the digestible and metabolisable energy content of barley for growing pigs based on chemical composition. Archives of Animal Nutrition 71(2): 108-119, 2017

Effect of feeding rapeseed meals varying in the content of antithyroid compounds on the vitamin a status of growing pigs with respect to iodine supply. Journal of Animal Physiology & Animal Nutrition 61(2-3): 57-67, 1989

Effects of ammonia and steam treatments on the composition and nutritional value of canola low glucosinolate rapeseed screenings in diets for growing pigs. Canadian Journal of Animal Science 63(2): 429-442, 1983