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Success and complication rates of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in patients with unstable angina pectoris after myocardial infarction comparison to ptca in patients with acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina pectoris without preceding infarction



Success and complication rates of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty in patients with unstable angina pectoris after myocardial infarction comparison to ptca in patients with acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina pectoris without preceding infarction



Zeitschrift fuer Kardiologie 78(2): 81-85



To evaluate whether there is a difference in terms of the sucess and complication rates of PTCA in patients (pts) with unstable angina pectoris (UAP) after myocardial infartion (group I) and patients with myocardial infarction (group II), as well as in patients with UAP without preceding myocardial infarction (group III), we analyzed the data of 188 patients retrospectively. Acute PTCA was performed in 42 patients of group I, 55 patients of group II, and 91 patients of group III. The primary success rate was comparable in all three group (group I: 74%; group II: 76%; group III:77%). The incidence of acute ACVB operation was comparable in group I (5 pts: 9%) and group III(10 pts: 11%). One patients was operated during an acute myocardial infarction. Five patients of group I (9%) and seven patients of group III(8%) developed a myocardial infarction. Three patients of group I (7%) and three patients of group II (5%) died during hospitalization. PTCA performed during acute myocardial ischemia has the highest complication rate in patients with UAP after myocardial infarction and is considerably higher than in patient with UAP without receding infarction.

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