EurekaMag.com logo
+ Site Statistics
References:
53,869,633
Abstracts:
29,686,251
+ Search Articles
+ Subscribe to Site Feeds
EurekaMag Most Shared ContentMost Shared
EurekaMag PDF Full Text ContentPDF Full Text
+ PDF Full Text
Request PDF Full TextRequest PDF Full Text
+ Follow Us
Follow on FacebookFollow on Facebook
Follow on TwitterFollow on Twitter
Follow on LinkedInFollow on LinkedIn

+ Translate

The optimal electrode setting and stimulus voltage for the recording of sep due to tibial nerve stimulation and the method to decide the stimulus voltage



The optimal electrode setting and stimulus voltage for the recording of sep due to tibial nerve stimulation and the method to decide the stimulus voltage



Shikoku Acta Medica 45(6): 383-402



The optimal electrode setting and stimulus voltage for the recording of SEP due to tibial nerve stimulation and the method to decide the stimulus voltage were studied with 40 healthy male subjects (26.2 .+-. 2.9, 20.5 .apprx. 33.2 years old) adopting "rms value (root mean square value)" as the indicator. The Principal Component Analyses (PCA) was also applied. The tibial nerve was stimulated electrically at the right ankle with different stimulus intensities from 60 to 120 V at an interval of 10 V. The SEPs were recorded from 13 monopolar derivation on the scalp, from Cz, Cz' (2 cm behind Cz), C3 P3, Pz and interpolating 5 more electrodes contralateral to, and 3 electrodes ipsilateral to the stimulation, referring to the both ear lobes (A1 + A2). The ranking of these electrode settings and stimulus voltages were obtained. The sensory threshold and twitching threshold for the tibial nerve stimulation of the subjects ranges 37.8 .+-. 7.5 (22.5 .apprx. 51.2) V and 100.1 .+-. 15.5 (44.8 .apprx. 130.9) V, respectively. The rms value tended to increase as the stimulus voltage increased from 60 V to 120 V, but the increment decreased beyond 90 V. The rms values were larger with the derivation 2 (Cz), 5 (Cz'), and 8 (middle point between Cz and Pz), adjacent to Cz' on the sagittal line. The rms values from the electrodes ipsilateral to the stimulation were consistently larger than those from the contrasting contralateral electrodes, supporting the paradoxical lateralization by Cruse etc. The integraded ranking of electrode setting derived from the sum of the deviation value of the inter-individually averaged rms value, and of the rms value of the Group mean SEP, ranged in the order, derivation 5, 3 and 8, with little difference between 5 and 3. The ispilateral electrodes were the higher ranking than the contralateral electrodes. While, the integrated ranking of electrode setting derived from PCA ranged in the order, derivation 5, 3 and 8. The integrated ranking of stimulus voltage derived from the sum of the deviation value of the inter-individually averaged rms value ranged in the order, 80 V, 90 V, 110, V and that from the sum of the deivation value of the Group Mean SEP rms value ranged in the order, 80 V, 90 V, 100 V. With the derivation 5, 3 and 8 up to the uppermost third rank, 80 V is the first rank consistently with these derivation and 90 V is the second rank with the Group Mean SEP. The integrated ranking of stimulus voltage derived from PCA using the data of the 3 electrode setting above mentioned ranged in the order, 90 V , 80 V, 110 V. Finally it was concluded that 80 V was the optima stimulus voltage. As for the methods to decide the stimulus voltage (1) applying the constant stimulus voltage for all subjects, (2) applying the stimulus voltages being set referring to the sensory and twitching threshold were compared, by rms value and the coefficient of variation, with the data from the 3 electrode setting ranking high. Each of the methods has merits and demerits at the stimulus voltage around 80 V .times. 90 V, and has little differences beyond 100 V.

(PDF emailed within 1 workday: $29.90)

Accession: 007920582

Download citation: RISBibTeXText



Related references

Uses of ramp voltage stimulus in whole cell recording. Zhongguo Ying Yong Sheng Li Xue Za Zhi 13(3): 212, 282-212, 282, 1997

Extracellular voltage threshold settings can be tuned for optimal encoding of movement and stimulus parameters. Journal of Neural Engineering 13(3): 036009-036009, 2016

Dual range voltage divider and millivoltmeter for nerve stimulus study. Wasmann Collector 7(5): 207-210, 1949

Optical recording of dorsal root stimulus-induced responses in rat spinal cord slices stained with a voltage-sensitive dye. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts 19(1-3): 1195, 1993

Electrical stimulation of oculomotor nucleus: the effects of stimulus voltage and anesthesia. American Journal of Optometry and Archives of American Academy of Optometry 44(8): 505-516, 1967

Voltage and calcium responses to tactile stimulus in earthworm ventral nerve cord. Zoological Science (Tokyo) 14(SUPPL ): 105, 1997

A voltage-controlled current source with regulated electrode bias-voltage for safe neural stimulation. Journal of Neuroscience Methods 171(2): 248-252, 2008

A hybrid hardware and software approach for cancelling stimulus artifacts during same-electrode neural stimulation and recording. Conference Proceedings 2016: 6190-6193, 2017

Low frequency voltage clamp: Recording of voltage transients at constant average command voltage. Journal of Neuroscience Methods 99(1-2): 129-135, 30 June, 2000

Relationship between stimulus amplitude, stimulus frequency and neural damage during electrical stimulation of sciatic nerve of cat. Medical & Biological Engineering & Computing 33(3 Spec No): 426-429, 1995

The optimal pulse duration and intensity for the recording of sep due to tibial nerve stimulation. Shikoku Acta Medica 45(2-3): 160-168, 1989

Reduction in excitability of the auditory nerve following electrical stimulation at high stimulus rates. IV. Effects of stimulus intensity. Hearing Research 132(1-2): 60-68, June, 1999

Optimal setting of reactive compensation devices with an improved voltage stability index for voltage stability enhancement. International Journal of Electrical Power & Energy Systems 37(1): 50-57, 2012

Effects of stimulus frequency and NMDA receptor activation on the excitation propagation from layer 4 to layer 2/3 studied by optical recording using voltage sensitive dye in the rat thalamocortical slice. Neuroscience Research Supplement (24): S113, 2000

Effect of stimulus intensity on subcortical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials by posterior tibial nerve stimulation. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology 59(3): 229-237, 1984